Wednesday, November 16, 2011

OQLF Sign Directive Not Neccessarily Legal

Quebec's language watchdog agency, the Office québécois de la langue française (OQLF,) has announced that it is cracking down on stores that display unilingual English names without a French 'descriptors,' a phrase that precedes or follows the actual name and describes what is being sold.
"The Brick" and "Second Cup" are a no-no, but "Brick meubles et électroniques" and "Les cafés Second Cup" are fine, according to a new campaign by the Office québécois de la langue française.
Starting Monday, French TV commercials and an Internet site will induce companies to add French descriptions or slogans to their brand names, said Louise Marchand, president of the provincial agency in charge of protecting the French language.
"We will take all necessary measures so that at a very minimum, businesses will put up a description," Marchand told a news conference Sunday."
Read the rest of the story in the Montreal Gazette  or this  Alternate Link
Militants protesting a legal store sign...
The knee-jerk reaction by the language cops was to be expected as language militants have been ratcheting up the pressure, especially active these last weeks, culminating with a noisy march along Montreal's Ste. Catherine street, the main shopping drag, where marchers symbolically 're-baptised' the offending signs with French only versions.

And so the OQLF O-feece has mounted a new campaign to force merchants into line with directives that require,'English' store names attach a French descriptor.

The first question we must ask ourselves is why these descriptors are necessary, since everyone knows what is sold in Canadian Tire, Best Buy, The Brick etc.etc.
Even the staunchest of French-language militants will readily admit that the imposition of descriptors is based solely on desire to publicly aver that in Quebec, French is the king of the castle and English, the dirty rascal.

The demand that 'English' signs be defaced prefaced with French descriptors is more about humiliating English and anglophones than promoting French. It's simply a question of showing anglos their place.

Regulation respecting the language of commerce and business, RRQ, c C-11, r 9

25. On public signs and posters and in commercial advertising, the following may appear exclusively in a language other than French: 
(4) a recognized trade mark within the meaning of the Trade Marks Act (R.S.C. 1985, c. T-13), unless a French version has been registered

EXPRESSION THAT MAY SPECIFY FIRM NAME
27.   An expression taken from a language other than French may appear in a firm name to specify it provided that the expression is used with a generic term in the French language. LINK
According to my research, the above regulations have been on the books since 2003 and likely long before, but the OQLF until now, has never demanded that stores using English trade-marks modify their signs.

Readers, I'm no lawyer, but over the years I have become somewhat expert at reading laws, rules and regulations and have discovered rather surprisingly that not everything is as well written clear and precise as one would imagine.

In my humble opinion, Regulation 25(4) and Regulation 27 are not concordant.

First things, first.
There is a principle that in law, that holds that the specific trumps the general and this clearly is the case between the two regulations.
Nothing can be clearer than Regulation 25(4), while Regulation 27 uses the undefined term "expression."

Is a trademark an 'expression'?
Most likely not, because in using the term 'trade mark' in one rule and the word 'expression' in another, the writers imply that there is a difference.

If the intention of the writers was to make trademarks subject to descriptors, they should have said so unequivocally.
And so Regulation 27 should have read that when companies avail themselves of the benefits of rule 25(4) (that is, to use trademarks in their banner), they must add descriptors, but it doesn't.

And so, the current interpretation of the regulations by the OQLF may very well be faulty and hasn't, as of yet been tested in court, because the provisions have never been imposed.
It remains a legal question as to whether  the OQLF is over-reaching and misinterpreting its own regulations.

That being said, there remains a more important legal issue as to whether a provincial government  may impose limitation on the commercial use of trademarks at all, since trademarks belong in the federal jurisdiction.

Aside from all this, there remains the utter stupidity of telling a company like Canadian Tire that after 60 years of operation in Quebec, that its name is offensive.

The 'O-feece' published a guide this week, detailing what stores must do to fall in line with their interpretation of the rules and even here, one has to question the competency of the agency.

At the right is an example provided to the media by the O-feece describing a fictional merchant named "DAILY LIVING' and examples on how it can comply with the OQLF's current interpretation of the regulations.
Readers, how on earth does "DAILY LIVING" translate to "LES BEAUX JOURS"?
Utter, utter nonsense!....

Going back to the photo of the demonstrators above who are protesting the signage at the SECOND CUP, which is actually 100% in line with these new regulations, it underlines that separatists and language fanatics aren't interested in anything else except the total eradication of English in public.
They make no bones about it.

Incidentally, the O-feece announced that banners like 'Harveys' are exempt because they are proper names, but technically that isn't really true.
While 'Harvey' is a proper name, 'Harveys' with an 'S' acts as an English possessive, even though the apostrophe is gone.
In French no 'S' is added to indicate the possessive.

Readers of a certain age will recall that 'EATON'S' was forced to become 'EATON.'
And so unless the 'S' refers to a plural, such as in the McDonalds brothers who started the hamburger chain, the names should actually be disallowed!

Now the Wendy's hamburger chain has taken a page out of the Liberal Party handbook and replaced the apostrophe with a little Canadian Maple leaf.
Very clever, but I'm sure the O-feece will look closely at that and perhaps demand that a Fleur-de-lys replace the hated Canadian symbol!
You never know how ridiculous plays out in Quebec.

Such are the deep and esoteric questions that the O-feece must ponder.

I've nothing more to say except to express a profound sadness at the utter mindlessness and vindictiveness that drives people to hate.
This sign initiative is not driven by the desire to preserve the French language but rather motivated by a desire by one portion of society to impose its will on the other, solely because it can.

When language militants tell us self-satisfyingly to 'respect' an unjust law, I'm reminded of all the minorities around the world who are discriminated against on a daily basis, based only on the tyranny of numbers.

An unjust law need not be 'respected' and to language militants who tells us to obey or suffer the consequences, we should choose to suffer the consequences.

Remember the utter humiliation that language militants suffered by one article in the New York Times and one interview on 60 Minutes by Mordechai Richler. It still reverberates today.
I'm not sure that Quebec could stand a concerted publicity campaign in the USA decrying the rule that forces American companies to forsake or bastardize their names.

In the end Quebec Anglos have the power to resist and resist we should.

None of we Quebec anglos want to impose English on Quebec, but we'll be damned if militants attempt to take away what is ours, our names........

**************************************

To save the O-feece, much time and effort, I'd like to humorously propose some descriptors of my own; 

McDONALDS- Malbouef
THE GAP- Vetements pour les nuls.
TACO BELL- TACO BELLE
WINNERS - Vetements pour les perdants.
BANANA REPUBLIC- Republique du Quebec

Readers......How about some suggestions to help out the OQLF?

101 comments:

  1. Narrow-minded bigots ! That's all I have to say.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I really cannot believe that this is ongoing. It's like living in a nightmare over and over again.
    I really don't understand ... it's beyond my power of comprehension.
    It's like, everything is perfect in Montreal/Quebec and this is the shit that is holding us back.
    Do these people have jobs? I work and take care of my family and at the end of the day I'm wondering where did the time flew , and they have time for street protests and all that shit.

    It's getting annoying and we all should realize how these people hurt our province and country.
    A bunch of old crazies , nothing more than a couple of hundreds are representing Quebec in the world.
    It's a shame that there is no initiative for a party or a strong movement against this.

    I love Canada and Quebec should be a part of it...but unfortunately the crazies are preventing this.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't think I can improve on PHIL's first three words. Considering the subject, his words are about as eloquent and succinct as can be.

    Be that as it may, that uglier-than-a-bulldog bitch who is head of the OQLF is none other than Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest's appointee.

    Yes, Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest, defender of federalism, appointed that ugly cretin to lead this most fascist of Quebec gouvernemama's departments. Boy, he's as federalist as Adolf Hitler liked Jews, Slavs, Gypsies and other ethnics who were getting in his way of world domination.

    With any luck François Le-Go will defeat Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest in the next Quebec election, and piss Harper off for all he's worth before the next round of equalization formula discussions in 2014 and hang Quebec by its thumbs for all this fascist nonsense is worth.

    As the Editor suggests, you Anglophones who, as you wrote me previously, chose to stay, should fight this b.s. for all it's worth, but then again, the fights should have taken place 35 years ago, but didn't. If you do your usual sitting on your hands, you'll get exactly what you deserve.

    My roads here in Mississauga continue to be paved. Language police money very well spent! My street here was repaved 3-4 years ago. My old street in Chomedey hasn't been repaved since it was initially paved in 1962. Life in Mississauga 1, Chomedey 0, very sad to say.

    ReplyDelete
  4. So I see that the fascist frogs are at it again. I really have nothing else to say about this. Like the poster above me said, that separatist piece of filth Charest appointed this bitch who looks like someone from a wax museum. I freaking hope the big box stores leave Quebec as a result of this.

    ReplyDelete
  5. As I've said countless times before, all this bullshit about "protecting the French language" is merely a guise for enacting government sanctioned racism and bigotry towards English-born persons.

    French is in much in peril as the common cold virus. Neither are in danger of disappearing anytime soon. And organizations like the OQLF are about as irritating and welcome as a cold or virus.

    You know what, if I ran a big corporation, this would be the FINAL straw and I would pull out of Quebec. Much like Cara Operations Ltd has done with Swiss Chalet, Montana's and Kelsey's Bar & Grill (and soon to follow...Harvey's).

    Oh how I would love to see McDonald's, Walmart, Sears, Canadian Tire, The Gap, Old Navy, Best Buy, The Brick, etc, etc, etc (i.e. every American and Canadian chain store) LEAVE QUEBEC FOREVER. Let Quebec further isolate itself from the rest of civilization.

    All Quebecers, French and English, should stages protests in front of the OQLF offices and demand the organization be dissolved. Maybe the Wallstreet protesters in downtown Montreal should move their tents in front of the OQLF office on Sherbrooke street. :) At least that would be a good and produce cause to bettering society!

    ReplyDelete
  6. "Life in Mississauga 1, Chomedey 0..."

    Tim Horton in Mississauga 17, Chomedey 0.

    ReplyDelete
  7. @M. Sauga 12:52

    After harper screwed ontario by adding 3 seats for Quebec and only 13 seats of the earlier promised 18, in his new parliamentary expansion bill. I really don't have much hope for Harper taking a stand against Quebec.

    ReplyDelete
  8. As usual, Quebec attacks it's minorities. Trying to bully them out of the way. Back of the bus all of you. And if you have something to say, say it in french or shut up. Out of sight, and out of mind. Unless they need to stir up more hate against them. Then they'll make up stories.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Regulation 27 mentions an "expression". Regulation 25 mentions a registered trademark.

    So once a business name gets registered with the board of trade, it automatically falls under Regulation 25. Which means that if pushed harder, the OQLF will be forced to admit that Dairy Queen, Old Navy, Canadian Tire, etc... are in compliance with the law. It will be the same thing as with the "Esso on the Run" fiasco.

    The OLF is pandering to the militants right now, trying to sidestep the issue and come up with diversions, like 50,000$ for businesses that play ball. But in the end, the OLF will be restrained by its own laws. It won't be able to issue fines for chain names.

    The bigger question is why did Quebec mainstream media so one-sidedly back this latest outburst of militant hate... There must be a reason.

    ReplyDelete
  10. "BANANA REPUBLIC = Republique du Quebec"

    LOL. This would be a fitting change of name. It would go from general to specific, from "a" banana republic to "the" banana republic.

    ReplyDelete
  11. "...you Anglophones who, as you wrote me previously, chose to stay, should fight this b.s. for all it's worth..."

    Bel exemple venant d'un peureux qui a choisi la fuite vers le royaume du donut.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Appears the OQLF have a lot on their plate these days.

    Check this out.

    http://www.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/societe/2011/11/15/001-oqlf-enquete-caisse-depot.shtml

    Imagine that, the Caisse hiring two unilingual anglos to work in Quebec. Kind of puts an end to the argument that you need French to work in Montreal. Now that being said, the one person has been in Quebec 11 years and hasn't apparently learned any French which I find a bit strange. The one employee is actually the head of human relations for the real estate subsidiary of the Caisse. No doubt this will raise some questions in the media!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  13. As usual, another great article editor. I got a good laugh out of your name suggestions.

    To be honest, I think it goes beyond just trying to get to english people. As I've written before, I'm am certain that there are a group of people in this province who don't want to see *anyone* making money, ESPECIALLY not a dirty anglophone or immigrant.
    Didn't we go through this exact same situation some years ago, which ended up with Second Cup stores being bombed by separatist extremists? Didn't they add "Les Cafés" to their name?
    And yet, the language nazis are back.

    This leads me to believe that it's not an issue with the name, but more of an issue with non-francophones making money off the poor, oppressed, francophone working class.
    Really, what can Second Cup do to get rid of these crazies? "Les Cafés Québécois Deuxième Tasse" I'm sure the crazies would still find something wrong with that.

    The OQLF obviously has a budget to justify before the end of the fiscal year, or else it gets cut next year.
    I'm still waiting for someone to explain to me how "Loft Story" was acceptable though.

    And I've always been curious, perhaps someone can answer this: How many companies refuse to do business in this province because of our racist language laws?

    Quebecker of Tree Stump

    ReplyDelete
  14. I think someone should encourage the OQLF to start applying language laws to the internet.

    After all, this is Quebec! Et au Québec, ça se passe en français sti!

    I suggest we get a province-wide firewall, a bit like China. Then the OQLF could decide which online content meets the language requirements for this province, and they could allow those sites only.

    Enough of dirty anglophones trying to assimilate us!

    Someone please write them a letter to suggest it.

    ReplyDelete
  15. "We have been, we are, and I trust we always will be detested by the French" - The Duke of Wellington

    ReplyDelete
  16. In today's society, with the internet, cable & music, it's impossible to get rid of the English language no matter how hard they try. Trying to get big business to add some sort of french slogan to their names is solely for the appearance of this being a french society.

    To attempt this sort of domination over any language (especially the main language of North America) is such a discrace. The only reason this is going on is because not enough people/companies are standing up and saying 'Enough with all this English bashing!!!'

    We are where we are because no one is protesting against this. The squeaky wheel is always the one to get the oil. Why do you think the french militants keep getting their way (it's because they keep protesting in large numbers !!!)

    ReplyDelete
  17. We are where we are because no one is protesting against this. The squeaky wheel is always the one to get the oil. Why do you think the french militants keep getting their way (it's because they keep protesting in large numbers !!!)

    You cannot expect productive, working people to give up entire days of work to stand on Ste-Catherines protesting. We have families, jobs, and more important things to take care of.

    Language nazis are usually unemployed and on welfare (B.S.), so they have plenty of free time, the government is paying them.

    So while one group of (lazy and unproductive) people are out protesting, the group they are protesting against are hard at work, keeping the province running.

    Isn't it ironic that the people who are claimed to be "destroying this province and it's culture" are actually the ones who are keeping the province going?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Remember these are racist extremists, they will NEVER be satisfied. The "English problem" will still be present in some form.

    You could eliminate every signal last trace of English from signs, yet these extremists and their goons (the QOLF) would then target spoken English in public...and then in private. Eventually they would find it a problem that Anglophones own businesses--that is a threat to Quebecois culture. It will never stop until English speakers are either forced to leave Quebec. Surely some would refuse, so a final solution would be required.

    Acceptance of intolerance, left to fester, it WILL eventually come to that. When Quebec's economy finally collapses like Greece, who will be blamed? Take a guess.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Anonymous at 12:13,

    Out of curiosity, who pays Mario Beaulieu and the whole SSJB and its subsidiaries? Surely they have steady stream of income to finance their activities.

    ReplyDelete
  20. “Militants protesting a legal store sign...” These people are not militants. They are bigots; they are racists, just like all the politicians have been for decades in Kebec. They have all supported the racist, bigoted anti-English language laws (bills 22, 178, 101…) of Kebec. These people protesting are just like the people who have run Kebec into the ground for the last 5 decades.

    So sad that Kebec has come to this. We can only hope the world is watching what is going on in Kebec. This folks is why some one million people and over 4,000 head office have left Kebec over the last several decades. Hatred, intolerance all wrapped up into so-called “rights” in Kebec. One big lie, the “French” way.

    Do what most of us in Canada already do, boycott the province and all companies with head offices inside Kebec.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I've always wondered how we can import welfare subscribers to the rest of Canada. Use them like the pur laine chauvanists do. Counter protest while taking a chunk of welfare from the Quebec government, hopefully enough to cut the OQLF budget.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Editor. You forgot to mention the price tag of this abomination.
    $500,000-$600,000 to try to convince business to be more French oriented. And the funny part is the adverts and website are only in French, so how the hell are the English supposed to understand these absurd made up rules if they are not even properly explained!

    ReplyDelete
  23. "Tim Horton in Mississauga 17, Chomedey 0."

    MDR!Hahahahahahaha!Ne vous demandez pas pourquoi les anglos,surtout leurs femmes,sont si grosses.

    ReplyDelete
  24. No Worries, Even the Caisse has learnt its better to hire anglos to run things, rather than the incompenent Quebecois who lost 40 billion dollars. Hell, they have even hired unilingual anglos in key positions :):)

    ReplyDelete
  25. "Ne vous demandez pas pourquoi les anglos,surtout leurs femmes,sont si grosses."

    Eh bien, au moins une femme les Anglos se rasent les aisselles et l'usure deordorant. Pas comme le québécois Femmes. Vous avez un encore boul de poutine.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Out of curiosity, who pays Mario Beaulieu and the whole SSJB and its subsidiaries? Surely they have steady stream of income to finance their activities.

    As far as I know, all these separatist/language groups are funded by larger separatist organizations (read: Parti Québécois), and by the unions. The PQ was one of vigile.net's biggest supporters in the past.

    Also they probably receive government (read: Our money) funding, in the name of "culture and language".

    Your question is like asking "how can the BS (welfare) people afford to drink beer?"
    They do whatever they can (even if it involves criminal activities). More important things are placed on the backburner.

    The best example is the period from 1994 to 2003 where the PQ were in power. A referendum and ridiculous language laws were more important than investing in our infrastructure. And we were left with crumbling roads, eternal wait times in hospitals, and schools who can't even teach kids how to spell.
    It's taken nearly 10 years and we still haven't fixed all the damage caused by Parizeau / Bouchard / Landry.

    ReplyDelete
  27. La quintessence des l'anglos et leur mentalité de surconsommateur :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhWvT7iv1xU&feature=related

    ReplyDelete
  28. - Even the Caisse has learnt its better to hire anglos to run things -

    http://tinyurl.com/7efns54

    ReplyDelete
  29. Ha ha ha...now they want Smith to "apprendre le francais.... What a bunch of paranoid morons in Quebec with all their silly language issues.. Le Francais avant tout, no matter if you go broke as long as you speak Quebecoise (pas le vrais francais mais bien la joual)

    ReplyDelete
  30. The SSJB receives funding from the government. In essence, Charest's gov't continues to support what was once..long ago..a festive and inclusive organization now morphed into a maelstrom of hatred and xenophobia. To see what the SSJB *should* be checkout the Manitoba chapter:
    http://www.ssjb.ca

    ReplyDelete
  31. Anonymous at 12:58,

    Boycotting Quebec-based organizations is easier said than done. Bell, Air Canada, VIA Rail, Corus, Saputo, Molson are headquartered in Quebec. While alternatives are available, those companies are already deeply ingrained in Canadian lifestyle.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Boycotting ......

    Well hmmm.

    Bell , how about Telus, Rogers, Allstream, etc

    VIA....who the hell takes the train these days.

    CORUs ..Actually Toronto and controlled from Calgary (Read Shaw family) ...Last I heard they sold all their broadcast interests in Quebec to Cogeco.

    Saputo: Well, there a lot of producers of Cheese and dairy products outside of Quebec, not too mention the US if the Canadian Government would open up the markets and cut the foolish subsidies.

    In short, lots of options outside of Quebec headquartered companies.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Dear editor, re your analysis of sections 25 and 27 of the Regulation, and your conclusion that they are "not concordant" - with respect- you have it wrong. You did state the key point elsewhere in your piece. A trade-mark is regulated exclusively by the federal government. An "expression" may be regulated by a province. This is basic and settled law. There is no real legal question here. And in passing there is no legal principle that the specific trumps the general etc. There are discrete rules for statutory interpretation but they are tricky for non lawyers. But none of that really matters as you are doing a fine job provoking discussion among your readers about the underlying political and social issues.

    On those questions I am always a little surprised by the emotion aroused by the Charter and the Office that enforces it. Unfortunately for those who are still ranting about racism and facism - in a democracy the majority rules. And the Charter is widely supported in Quebec, including by many anglos. The ranters just spout the same old stuff. They ignore realpolitik and neglect to mention the <> point. Many hard line sovereignists ruefully admit that the Charter took a lot of steam out of their cherished movement. So thanks for building a stronger Canada Rene, wherever you are. Now it's time to move on. There are bigger and better targets out there than the Charter of the French Language.

    One last quibble. If memory serves Eaton's changed its signs to Eaton in Quebec voluntarily. I believe it was primarily a marketing decision, not a legal one. Perhaps it helped, but obviously not enough.

    ReplyDelete
  34. The eleventh line of my post above should read ...the "raisins de colere" point.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Sandy: "A trade-mark is regulated exclusively by the federal government. An "expression" may be regulated by a province."

    If that's true, then organizations such as Dairy Queen, Best Buy, Future Shop, or Second Cup certainly have their trademarks registered with the federal government, since they function all over Canada, which makes the recent OLF initiative suspect and illegal.

    Also, this means that any Quebec-specific business can register its trademark with the federal government to make itself immune from the language charter as far as its name is concerned.

    Sandy: "And the Charter is widely supported in Quebec, including by many anglos. "

    Many Anglos? Sandy, you must be smoking some good shit.

    As for the support for 101 in Quebec, I must ask you 2 questions:

    1. Do you think that just because something enjoys the support of the majority, it cannot be wrong? See, legislations like The Bill of Rights in the US and the Charters of Rights in Quebec and Canada were passed in order to prevent any future majorities from imposing their arbitrary will on minorities. Unfortunately the realpolitik of Canada and the politics of national unity rendered the Canadian Charters impotent.

    2. Does the fact that the majority of Quebeckers support 101 testifies to the purity and legitimacy of of 101, or rather to the crapiness of Quebeckers?

    ReplyDelete
  36. Erratum: I really meant Astral, not Corus.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Boycotting Quebec business sounds like a good idea. Change must come.

    ReplyDelete
  38. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  39. and one more thing before I leave the sits, who is that uneducated clown of Sandy Mctire with nothing in between her two ears

    A Self-hating english-speaker that is affected by some sort of identity issues???

    As if that she knows alot, AS IF!!!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Re the Mississauga Tim Horton's wise-cracks: [Place wide-mouthed gaping yawn here]. Old, boring, unoriginal and trite--just like Quebec's dire lack of innovation and productivity (really, the lack thereof).

    Re large corporations leaving Quebec: If revenues exceed costs, businesses stay; if not, the fold or leave. If the businesses have been around a long time, chances are revenues are exceeding costs. The net result is called profit, and if profits are being made, why should they pack up and leave? Big business decisionmakers make foolish decisions everyday, but cutting off their noses to spite their profits? Come now!

    Even if Quebec was to separate, inevitably certain businesses and industries would suffer big-time, but most who implement sound business practices and maintain their happy customer base would unlikely suffer a lick--that is, if their customer base is outside Quebec.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Good Grief ! Reading the comments on this blog after dark reminds me of listening to talk radio in West Virginia. But I digress...

    7:53 Best Buy - I don't follow most of your comment. You seem to understand why Future Shop is a perfectly legal business name in Quebec but then it trails off. Apparently you don't understand what the recent OQLF initiative is all about. They are not proposing anything illegal.

    And re: the number of Anglos who have no problem with the Charter of the French Language there is really no point in exchanging juvenile insults. And I don`t smoke.

    I do not understand your 2 questions. Everything after 1. makes no sense. I can't help you.

    And 11:48 Anonymous...``Sandy`` is one of the diminutives of Alexander. I am a male of the species, not female. No worries. Have another vodka. It's still early for you.

    A Demain

    ReplyDelete
  42. FYI, L'Equipeur (part of the Canadian Tire organization) is rebranding itself across the country as Mark's. No more L'Equipeur.

    ReplyDelete
  43. "L'Equipeur (part of the Canadian Tire organization) is rebranding itself across the country as Mark's. No more L'Equipeur. "

    Is this a backlash from what's going on in Quebec? Or unrelated?

    ReplyDelete
  44. @Sandy McTire:

    Personally, I have no issues with wanting to protect and promote french throughout the province. I have no problems with encouraging newly arrived immigrants to learn french. I believe everyone in the province (and I'm a dreamer, so everyone in the country) should be bilingual. How great would that be?

    That's not the problem though. These measures have nothing to do with protecting french. It's about getting back at the "méchants anglais".

    Can you explain why, as a citizen of this province, whose family has been in this province for generations, who speaks both french and english perfectly, I cannot freely chose the language of education for my children? To be clear, I'm not asking you to provide a service in the language of my choice. I'm asking to at least have the choice. If I'm dumb and I want my kids to goto school in spanish, isn't that my problem? And obviously since there's no demand for spanish schools, there won't be any in my area. But still, I'd have the choice.
    Impose french schools on newly arrived immigrants for a few years, that's fine. I'm a "Québécois de Souche" who happens to be able to speak english...

    Or can you explain why language extremists need to make laws (and waste everyone's money) to make sure they are served adequately? The law of supply and demand doesn't exist in Quebec?
    Nobody is asking you to accept to be served in a language you don't understand. So how about you stop spending money at places that don't serve you properly, instead of protesting against them?

    ReplyDelete
  45. To: Anon @9:09
    I wish they'd go back to my favourite Bill 101 name ever!!!

    L'Ouerhouse

    Re: MARK'S....They better not bring that apostrophe to Quebec!!

    ReplyDelete
  46. "méchants anglais"

    TssTss!Il y a longtemps qu'on ne dit plus ça au Québec.On dit plutôt:"Ostie d'anglas".Vous voilà
    à jour.

    ReplyDelete
  47. TssTss!Il y a longtemps qu'on ne dit plus ça au Québec.On dit plutôt:"Ostie d'anglas".Vous voilà à jour.

    C'est toujours mieux que "Criss de BS à marde"

    ReplyDelete
  48. Mark's Work Wearhouse = L' Ouerhouse = L'Equipeur = Mark's = Chez Marc ?

    ReplyDelete
  49. Mark's Work Wearhouse = L' Ouerhouse = L'Equipeur = Mark's = Chez Marc = Closure of business in Quebec, LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  50. @ Editor,

    The actual spelling was "La Ouerasse." Still very funny, especially the last few letters...

    ReplyDelete
  51. "C'est toujours mieux que "Criss de BS à marde"

    Faux: Le BS est peut-être une situation temporaire.

    L'angla : Aucune chance,c'est pour toute sa vie 8-)

    ReplyDelete
  52. Re: Mark's Work Wearhouse re-branding itself "Mark's" nationally. That will never fly in the xenophobic, racist and backwards region of the world known as Quebec.

    Keep in mind, internationally, Esso brands its gas-station convenience stores "On the Run". Yes, WORLD WIDE IN OVER 40 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES ON PLANET EARTH, the the English name "On The Run" is on store signs and accepted. Russia, Belgium, South Africa, Italy, Asia, Denmark, the Middle east, and yes, even FRANCE (the mother land of the French language!). All these countries have no problem with the English name "On the Run".

    Except Quebec. Quebec is the ONLY REGION ON PLANET EARTH where it must be called "Marche Express". Threats of violence were made when Esso tried to re-brand it to its trademarked English name used worldwide. This is the same story with KFC, Quebec is once again the only place on planet Earth where it must be PFK (again even stores in France display it as KFC).

    Quebec is mentally in a sick state of mind. Period. That's all there is to it. There is no rational, and anyone who tries give one, is in a sick state of mind themselves.

    ReplyDelete
  53. "Le BS est peut-être une situation temporaire."

    Not in your case.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I dont think BS is a French term unless of course they are borrowing it from the English. In any event to anon@2:51 ...you seem to be full of it.

    ReplyDelete
  55. "I dont think BS is a French term unless of course they are borrowing it from the English"

    You're not thinking of the right BS.
    You see here in Quebec, we have a group of people who would rather drink beer and spend their days protesting against "Second Cup" rather than be productive members of society.

    The Société St-Jean Baptiste has made sure that these people don't have to go out and work, so they won't get exploited by the "méchants anglais".
    So every 1st of the month, our government sends these people money so they can go out and get "une caisse de 24", and donate to vigile.net

    This group of people are named "Bien-Aide Social", or simply B.S. for short.

    I hope that helps.

    ReplyDelete
  56. "Bien-Aide Social"

    Correction : Bien-être social ou aide sociale.

    Avec l'arrivée prochaine de François Legault sur la scène politique Québécoise,la chasse à l'anglouille deviendra un sport de plus en plus populaire.Peut-être même notre sport National.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Anonymous 4:32 PM, but in order to hunt, you have to change your BS habits and get off your ass. Are you sure you're ready for such a drastic change?

    ReplyDelete
  58. to anonymous at 4:32 PM (Pobably that Poutine muncher of Press9)

    "Bien-Aide Social"

    Correction : Bien-être social ou aide sociale.

    Avec l'arrivée prochaine de François Legault sur la scène politique Québécoise,la chasse à l'anglouille deviendra un sport de plus en plus populaire.Peut-être même notre sport National.


    wow since you are able to make a clear correction on that point, then you must have a lot of experience in that field?!?

    and by the way, francois legault isn't gonna do shit about the english fact in montreal, since he's party won't be something like the party quebecois or any other silly meaningless spinoffs....and wait till the PQ and other seppie diesappear form the political spectrum, we'll see who's gonna get the last laugh...maybe your national sport will be the process of disappearing from face of this province and be left behind for good

    ReplyDelete
  59. Tsk Tsk. More "Anonymous" ranting. These fellows would fit right in over at Vigile. Apart from the obvious translation requirement all most of them would have to do, dear editor, is change the words "french" or "Quebec" to "english" and "Canada" and their posts would blend right into Vigile's patented anglophobia. Sadly, many of the posts to No Dogs and Vigile too often demonstrate the uninformed prejudice which is still a feature of the Two Solitudes.

    @Best Buy 7:53pm - You get the trade-mark point then you contradict yourself. The OLF is not concerned with trade-marks. What they have in mind is perfectly legal. And re the will of the majority you have missed a key point. You see, the Charter of Rights does not apply to the OLF initiative because it doesn't violate anyone's Charter rights.

    @Anonymous 11:48 pm - "Sandy" is a diminutive of Alexander. Male of the species. Have ye never been to Scotland laddie?

    And @Anonymous 10:11 am - Something doesn't compute. If your family has lived in Quebec for generations you are entitled to have your children educated in english. Re your question about why "language extremists" need certain laws I suggest you review the debates in the National Assembly over the Charter of the French Language and its subsequent amendments. It is all there in black and white. No one should assume that life is always fair all of the time for every stakeholder in a democracy. You will live longer if you accept that reality and move on. And speaking of moving on, there is always "101 or 401". I am sure Mr Sauga will help you find a house on a freshly paved street in Mississauga (sometimes known as the City that Rene Levesque built).

    A Bientot

    ReplyDelete
  60. @Mctire 06:41 PM

    I'm fed up of people like you saying take it or leave it... We have a right to stand up and fight for our rights. Say or write what we think...We pay equal taxes in this Banana Republic.. Don't need Uncle Toms like you to tell us otherwise..

    ReplyDelete
  61. Actually Sandy there is having a backbone unlike your type of anglos, which is extending the 401 to east of St Laurent boulevard and partitioning Quebec. Thats the only way to stick it to these pur laine chauvanists and their collaborators. Actually much of ontario prospered from the anglo allo exodus from Quebec, even the bank of Montreal headquarters is in Toronto. Despite taking the 401 to move from 101, the taxes are sent back to Quebec for more 101 in the form of equalization. Its better I send more welfare cases up the 401 into montreal to suck some Welfare money from the quehec governemamma. Especially english speaking welfare recipients. Hopefully it will suck some "L'offeece" budget as well.

    ReplyDelete
  62. @ Sandy Mctire,

    "And speaking of moving on, there is always "101 or 401"."

    And you should go back to Scotland, if that is where you came from. You're a Quisling with Stockholm Symdrome.

    ReplyDelete
  63. To Sandy McTire

    I see you're getting a bit of heat for your opinions, but don't be intimidated.
    As editor of this blog, I appreciate conflicting views, especially those that disagree with myself.
    That is what debate is about....
    How sad it would be if all the comments that this blog received were those that agreed with me....
    Keep commenting!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  64. @ Sandy Mctire,

    "And @Anonymous 10:11 am - Something doesn't compute. If your family has lived in Quebec for generations you are entitled to have your children educated in english."

    You should concentrate a bit more or check your eyesight Sandy. He said that he was a "Quebecois de Souche" who happens to be able to speak English.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Dear Anonymous, whoever youse guys are - please try anonymous 1, anonymous 2 etc. so we can tell you apart - and please try a little bit harder to be courteous. We aren't on talk radio in West Virginia.

    Now we have Anonymous 9:02 pm interpreting to the world what Anonymous 10:11 really meant. Has the fate of Quebec really come to this. Say it ain't so...dear editor

    ReplyDelete
  66. Whoops, Dear Editor, re your 8:49, thank you for your encouragement. I hadn't noticed that I was disagreeing with you. I'm just trying to help with the facts.

    These anonymous fellows are not what we call heat in my world. More like a wet fart in a blind alley. Frankly, I often have difficulty understanding what the heck they are talking about. Far too much aggressive emotion. I think many of these anonymous fellows need a good therapist.

    But - hey! - that's la vie quotidienne in talk radio - and in blogs like yours. The intersection of the Two Solitudes. It's edgy. It's risky. And it's definitely not pretty. Perhaps no good will come of all the blah blah. At the very least some of the anglo ethnic nationalists have a chance to vent.

    Keep on Ranting in the Free World... and Vive le Canada Libre !

    ReplyDelete
  67. Sandy: "The OLF is not concerned with trade-marks."

    What do you mean it's not concerned with trademarks? Regulation 25 states:

    "On public signs and posters and in commercial advertising, the following may appear exclusively in a language other than French:
    (4) a recognized trade mark within the meaning of the Trade Marks Act (R.S.C. 1985, c. T-13), unless a French version has been registered"


    Still smoking that shit, Sandy?

    ReplyDelete
  68. Sandy may be an anglo with a Stockholm Syndrome but more likely he's a franco quebecois posing as an anglo to get some of that "I'm one of you" cred. What makes me think it is Sandy's skillful muddying of waters and double talk, typical of the Quebecois coached since childhood to defend 101 no matter what by all means available, like changing the subject, contradictions, and circular (il)logic (trademarks are legal, but "expressions" are not, yet the olf does not deal with trademarks, but it deals with 101 whose regulation 25 explicitly mentions trademarks...).

    I know anglos who are apologists for 101, but they are never as coached, predictable, die-hard and cynical. Only the Quebecois are.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Sandy, let's cut the crap and make it as simple as possible: Best Buy, Future Shop, Dairy Queen, Old Navy...

    Legal in Quebec or not? Yes or no, and why or why not?

    ReplyDelete
  70. *Ahem*. The Charter of the French Language should be used as toilet paper. Is that meant as an inflammatory comment? Nope, just stating the value and merit of that so-called "charter".

    Charters do not remove rights from other charters. Nor does a language have rights (individual human beings do!). I suggest you read the article from the Suburban paper entitled "When is a Charter not a Charter?" for some insight.

    ReplyDelete
  71. "...francois legault isn't gonna do shit about the english fact in montreal..."


    http://www.faitsetcauses.com/?p=1034

    ReplyDelete
  72. @Sandy McTire:

    "Now we have Anonymous 9:02 pm interpreting to the world what Anonymous 10:11 really meant."

    They all understood me properly, but apparently you didn't, so they were just trying to help you out a bit.

    I notice that you took the time to point out how superior you are to everyone who posts here, and yet you weren't able to answer any of our questions or address any of our points.

    Your response? You suggest reading material.. And then you move on to the typical "move out if you don't like it". I don't think anyone is very impressed.

    ReplyDelete
  73. @Best Buy 12:59 am and 1:04 am - You have answered your own question. If "Future Shop", or any other english name is a registered trade-mark under the federal legislation it is perfectly legal to use it on a commercial sign in Quebec. In my earlier comment I could have said "...The OLF is not concerned with ENGLISH trade-marks" but I thought it was obvious since the whole topic and discussion is about english names. Incidentally, the Quebec Regulation is not the legislation that validates the use of english language trade-marks in Quebec. That is the result of federal legislation and Section 91 of the Constitution Act. The Quebec regulation merely codifies the existing law.I hope that helps to clear up your confusion.

    And I am not a francophone masquerading as an anglophone. I am a Quebecois de souche for those of us who consider Quebecois to be a term that simply translated means "Quebecer". My earliest ancestor to live in Quebec was one of the Associates who in 1802 was granted 1200 acres in what became Compton County. The rocks my ancestors and their fellow pioneers rolled to clear the wilderness are still there if you ever have a chance to explore the valley of the Coaticook River. Another direct ancestor was an anglo "Patriote" who served in the Legislative Assembly with Papineau and went into exile after the rebellion. He believed in responsible government and in speaking his mind - as do his descendants. And as you may have guessed, I am a lawyer who has been in practice for 32 years. So I trust those are satisfactory credentials for participation in your debates about Quebec issues.

    One last piece of free advice, Best Buy - you will never get anywhere in a debate by trying to insult the people who you think disagree with you. All you are doing is diminishing your own credibility. Try a little courtesy now and then. And read up on the Stockholm syndrome because, with respect, you clearly do not understand the term.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  74. @Anonymous 10:32 am - As noted in my comment above I also consider myself a Quebecois de souche who happens to speak english. Hence my confusion about why you can't have your children educated in english. Where I come from that expression does not denote a francophone, unless you are one of those ethnic nationalist fellows who thinks that Quebecois always means a francophone. To return to your initial question, the reason for this state of affairs is because the education aspects of the Charter were specifically intended to limit the choice of francophones and force them to attend french language schools. Its just that simple. Camille Laurin spoke and wrote extensively about this 30 -35 years ago. Its an old question and the answers are all in the records of the debate that took place in Quebec in the late seventies. It's over. And nothing has changed since then.

    Also, I am not trying to impress you or point out how superior I am or whatever. I could not care less whether you agree with me or whether you are impressed. I'm also not trying to persuade you to change your opinions. But I don't have a lot of patience for the same tired old emotional responses, accusations of facism, nazism etc. being trotted out everytime the OLF does something within their mandate - which was established 30 years ago. Hence my repeated suggestion that people have to move on instead of nursing old grievances. At least no one on this blog is still complaining about the "Conquest" or Lord Durham. So perhaps we should be grateful for small mercies.

    ReplyDelete
  75. @ Sandy de Compton

    Vous avez réduit vos opposants en compote...De pommes ;)

    ReplyDelete
  76. "And I am not a francophone masquerading as an anglophone. I am a Quebecois de souche for those of us who consider Quebecois to be a term that simply translated means "Quebecer". "

    What does this babble even mean?

    Are you a Franco or an Anglo?


    "Where I come from that expression does not denote a francophone, unless you are one of those ethnic nationalist fellows who thinks that Quebecois always means a francophone. "

    Where do you come from, Sandy? The moon?

    Here, on planet Earth and province Quebec, Quebecois means francophone and it's not even the opinion of the majority, it's something state-sanctioned since 1977 (and in Quebec, the mentality is always to conform to the state and the state's position is obvious, despite the "best treated minority in the world" PR stunt). And don't blame the anglos or allos for it either. It wasn't them who stirred up these divisions in recent decades.

    ReplyDelete
  77. @Best Buy - more silly insults. Are we having a bad day ? That "babble" is what is called plain english. I am an anglophone. My mother tongue is english. I hope that is clear enough for you. I drew my first breath at the Royal Vic in the middle of the last century. Then, and now, "Quebecois" is a french word that means a person who lives in Quebec - whether anglo or franco. Gilles Duceppe agrees with this, if you have ever heard him speak about it. Ditto Bernard Landry (at least, in public). And if YOU are an anglo in Quebec and you don't think you are a "Quebecois" then you have simply bought the narrow ethnic definition of the word that some sovereignists have been preaching for the last 50 years. You have been co-opted. But its never too late to adjust your thinking.

    I have no idea what you are referring to when you say its "state sanctioned since 1977". That's just incorrect. I'm not sure if you are familiar with the expression "a Quebecer". If you are, why don't you favour us all with your french translation of the english word "Quebecer".

    ReplyDelete
  78. @ Sandy Mctire,

    "...please try a little bit harder to be courteous. We aren't on talk radio in West Virginia."

    What a case of the kettle calling the teapot black. You're pompous, arrogant and obnoxious. Press 9 and yourself make a nice pair.

    ReplyDelete
  79. "I have no idea what you are referring to when you say its "state sanctioned since 1977"."

    For one, English was banned from public signage. How about that one? Don't you think that this sanctioned discrimination, restricted civic membership and narrowed the parameters of social inclusion down to one selected linguistic group, while excluding others?

    No biggie, you'd say, you could have still posted, only in French...Well, that's true, as is the fact that excuses can be found for anything and everything.

    These days, you can say that all that is in the past...you can post in English now if French is next to it and predominant. But first of all, this amendment was passed not out of a good will of the government of Quebec, but under UN pressure in 1993.

    Second of all, English has to be smaller. Big deal, you'd say. You can still use English. But you know what...in the 1960's they told Rosa Parks: "why does it bother you where you sit on the bus, you'll still be driven to where you want to go". Technically true, but Rosa Parks still objected despite the fact that she would have been driven from point A to point B all the same. She objected because being relegated to the back of the bus was a social statement that she wouldn't accept.

    But you wouldn't see her point. After all, law is the law, and she should have just shut her trap.

    ReplyDelete
  80. "...francois legault isn't gonna do shit about the english fact in montreal..."


    http://www.faitsetcauses.com/?p=1034

    November 18, 2011 10:01 AM
    Anonymous said...

    to my dear friend anonymous on november 18, 2011 10:01 AM (probably, press 9)

    That is just one of the many assumptions, He might attempt to reinforce the law but does it mean that he will be successful at it??? I mean, come on!!!With all those failed attempts being made in the past to drive the "squareheads" out of the island, pretty much guarantees that he will either fail in this potential attempt or not do SHIT ABOUT IT!! Can’t believe you seppies keep falling for every of bullshit he says!!! HELLO!!!! HE WANTS YOUR VOTES!!!

    and let me tell you one more thing Pal just to point out something very clearly, if that guy has an ounce of intelligence left in his brain, then he should be aware of the new consequences that will arise if he dares to reinforce bill 101, because if he extends the law, then thing in this province and also, in this city, will get from bad to worst and from worst to Even WORST… So basically, it ‘d be wiser on his part not to focus on this idea and leave things just as the way they are right now, because otherwise, it will certainly backfire, thus leaving irrecoverable damages behind.

    you love to live miserably just like a peasant, don’t you???

    ReplyDelete
  81. Shmandy: "The OLF is not concerned with ENGLISH trade-marks" but I thought it was obvious since the whole topic and discussion is about english names. Incidentally, the Quebec Regulation is not the legislation that validates the use of english language trade-marks in Quebec. That is the result of federal legislation and Section 91 of the Constitution Act."

    Now Sandy I believe you when you say that you are a lawyer.

    There is a guy in the US called Alan Dershowitz who apologizes for the excesses of Israel using the exact same kind of legalistic babble.

    You're in a good company, Sandy.

    ReplyDelete
  82. @Anglo Bashers - re the pot calling the kettle black, another useful contribution to the discussion. On the same level, may I offer : 'sticks and stones will break my bones but names will never hurt me'. I did notice that you did not call me discourteous, thanks. I suspect you don't like anyone who disagrees with you. So you lash out with a few insults. For me, that's just water off a duck's back. You have never met me and you don't know me so I forgive you. Next time, why not try a little critical thinking and you may get somewhere. Or is that too obnoxious a suggestion for you to handle ?

    @Best Buy - how does a simple and accurate answer to YOUR purely legal questions about trade-marks suddenly become "legalistic babble"? Perhaps you don't like the answer or possibly you don't understand it ? You should get a second opinion. By the way, how is your french translation of "Quebecer" coming along ?

    ReplyDelete
  83. Sandy, you muddied the waters enough already. Congratulations. You've outdone JF Lisee himself. And that's quite a feat.

    You state that the OLF is not acting in violation of 101, and then you admit that trademark names in English are legal. So why is the OLF acting on the militants' behalf in pressuring business to add French "descriptives" to the legal names? Or maybe the OLF is just pretending to act on the militants' behalf and thus lying to them? If so, why be so spineless and gutless?

    But maybe you're right. Attacking legal entities (English trademarks) to pressure them into doing something else that's also legal (English trademarks with a French "descriptive") is not illegal. It is, however, bullish and petty.

    And it raises a question: why not scrap article 25 altogether? Why have the article that puts legality on English trademarks, but continue to bully businesses to modify these trademarks anyways?

    This reminds me of a scene in the movie Office Space. A restaurant waitress is bullied by her boss to "express herself" by wearing more pieces of "flare" (pins). The required number of pieces of "flare" is 19, and she conforms by wearing 19, but another employee wears 35, so the boss is hounding the waitress that wears only 19. Finally, unable to take it anymore, the waitress snaps: "if you want me to wear 35 pieces of flare, why don't you make a rule for 35 pieces of flare?" Why wouldn't he implement the 35 rule? Because the 19 rule gives the petty manager room to bully his employees.

    Maybe it's the same thing with trademarks. Legally allow businesses to keep the original one, but also expect them to "express themselves", like PFK for example. If they don't express themselves, then is the time to project a power trip. Petty people who lost a war trying to get even and setting up conditions that would allow such bullying. Maybe that's what it boils down to.

    Or maybe they're afraid that businesses wouldn't come otherwise. So the idea is to first not to discourage them and lure them in, then bully them. Which is petty as well.

    ReplyDelete
  84. The bottomline is Quebec's language laws have absolutely no right to exist.

    They are as wrong, corrupt and invalid as laws that once stated blacks had to sit at the back of the bus, drink from separate water fountains and segregate their child at school.

    The so-called 'Charter of the French Language' is a racist doctrine, it just declares persons born of a certain race are superior to others. A language does not deserve rights, human beings do.

    You would have to be clinically insane, completely obtuse (read: stupid) or a racist to look at what has been transpiring in Quebec and say nothing is wrong. Everything is justifiable. No persons are being wronged. Unfortunately Quebec seems to be only populated by these three types. How else can you explain such an injustice lasting four decades?

    ReplyDelete
  85. @Best Buy - I think what is most significant is that the OLF initiative is essentially a publicity campaign. If a company's signage is already fully compliant they can, and probably will, tell the OLF to "fuggeta budit". No properly advised company can be bullied, in practical terms, if they are already following the law.

    One of the odd things about the whole "visage francaise" policy that gave rise to the OLF is that it is often discussed as a purely symbolic exercise to make francophones feel more comfortable and to impress on immigrants that Quebec is a french speaking society. It's a classic bureaucrat's big idea with a 50 year history that continues to have momentum because no Premier will touch it. But how can you ever measure the real results? Does everyone feel better ? Not the folks who are complaining about the so called excessive anglisization of Mtl. Are francophones boycotting Future Shop ? I don't think so. I guess we will all stay tuned and see how the publicity initiative turns out. One thing is for sure - there is bound to be some good comedy ahead. And this Quebecois prefers humour to anger.

    Bon Weekend

    ReplyDelete
  86. If the so-called (unilingual) "visage français" is so artificial that it needs to to be propped up by laws, then I agree that the Charte has failed in its mission.

    Also, while reading the comments posted on various French-language media outlets, I can't help but feel disgusted by the alarmist pompous and pretentious recriminations made by bumpkins living in distant rural towns and villages who decry the "anglicization" of Montreal. Do these people ever make it out of their cocoon or do they just come online and post any old thing?

    I'm not a fan of conspiracy theories, but my ongoing suspicion that our media manipulate us for sport and political gain is growing.

    I made that same comment about our city's fake French-only face on a French-language outlet's comments section earlier in the week, and added that the francophone media need to feature an equal and opposite point of view to the one espoused by the Curzis, Beaulieus, and MMFs. The comment was moderated and added to the discussion. I went back yesterday and saw the comment was no longer up.

    ReplyDelete
  87. Apparatchik: "my ongoing suspicion that our media manipulate us for sport and political gain is growing."

    I'd suggest a book, if I may:

    http://books.google.ca/books?id=29xoAAAAIAAJ&q=guardians+of+power&dq=guardians+of+power&hl=en&ei=EffHTvbPHtPJ0AHz8eD8Dw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDgQ6AEwAA

    The only thing we have left are books, and select blogs.

    ReplyDelete
  88. Apparatchik, look how the mainstream media went after Assange. I read a book about him written by two Guardian journalists, and the book was so disappointingly one-sided and almost a smear job, despite the best efforts of the authors to look "objective".

    The "liberal" Rachel Maddow of the "liberal" NBC slammed Assange on her show for his allegedly compromising of US security, even though it's the US gov't that compromises that country's security the most. Respect for Micheal Moore for coming on her show to defend Assange.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYI1rUQmzWQ

    Steve Kroft's CBS piece on Assange was a disgrace as well:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzC9invn4Ko

    ReplyDelete
  89. What's most disturbing is that grown men and women can't reason beyond the tip of their nose. Also vital to note is the fact that no matter the country or the topic, the media nervously seeks to silence and quash any criticism leveled at it.

    It never ceases to amaze me how this machine makes fools sound brilliant and, when it wants, makes brilliant people into villains.

    Maybe it's simple laziness on the part of those who consume media byproducts. But who doesn't read, watch, and listen to news, talkshows, podcasts, and blogs?

    We live in a world of prefab everything and mass consumerism. Seems only fitting we'd subscribe to philosophies (political, military, or otherwise) the way we subscribe to commercial brands.

    And of course, silence those who'd ruin the party.

    ReplyDelete
  90. Quick comment to Editor.

    The fact that "Daily Living" is not directly translated into french by "Les beaux jours" is completly beside the point, but it raises an interesting question.

    Sometimes, the best translation is not a literal translation. For example, and as was aptly noted on this blog, translating Future Shop to "Magasin du Futur" wouldn't be short of ridiculous. Some things simply don't translate well, and therefore imagination is needed to convey the same impression or idea in a different language. Noticed how "Bureau en gros" is not a translation of "Staples" ? Translating to "Agrafes" would have been a marketing disaster. To tell you the truth, I still have trouble understanding how they come up with such a name, even in English. This is just an example of how different languages shape the minds that grow up with them in different manners. To our febble french minds, "Bureau en gros" just makes so much more sense for an office supply store than "Agrafes".

    I guess that some french store names would translate pretty badly in english, too. Let's see. "Le château" becoming "The Castle" ? Not that bad, but not great. "Dumoulin électronique" becoming "Of the Mill electronics" ? Haha. I'm just being silly.

    ReplyDelete
  91. FYI: Staples was formerly called "The Business Depot" in Canada before changing its name to Staples. Quebec, being Quebec, stubbornly refused to rename its Quebec-based stores as was done in the rest of Canada and kept the ridiculous sounding name.

    Personally I find it easier to refer to it by its official and REAL name ("Staples") rather than such a long, wordy and meaningless title. Another benefit is when speaking about it with persons outside Quebec, they actual understand what store I'm referring to.

    Quite frankly no one should care if a store has an English name, the important thing is if you can be served in both English and French, including store literature in both languages. The irony is despite English names, quite a number of stores DO NOT have staff that speak a word of English (or simply refuse to out of rudeness that is so common amongst the Quebecois). I visited a Sony store in Laval a few weeks ago....all the staff refused to speak English, and then told me by law they were not allowed to carry English pamphlets for their products. The fun thing is this is extending to hospitals and medical clinics.

    ReplyDelete
  92. "and then told me by law they were not allowed to carry English pamphlets for their products"

    Seriously? Ok, in the rest of Canada, pamphlets in French should be banned by law. The official language there is English, and French speakers must therefore adapt. No more of that the RoC is bilingual/Quebec is uni-lingual crap. And it's funny how in reality it's the opposite to what's official - the RoC is uni-lingual , whereas Quebec is bilingual. Why does Canada and Quebec pursue this charade?

    "Never estimate the power of denial" - a great expression that fits Canada and Quebec like a glove.

    ReplyDelete
  93. @ Damien,

    "I guess that some french store names would translate pretty badly in english, too. Let's see. "Le château" becoming "The Castle" ? Not that bad, but not great. "Dumoulin électronique" becoming "Of the Mill electronics" ?"

    You should keep in mind that these stores with French names wouldn't be forced or bullied into adopting English names anywhere else in the world outside Quebec.

    ReplyDelete
  94. French should not be banned in the rest of Canada, however the official bilingualism act should be abolished. Rather than force French everywhere in Canada, it only needs to be applied where required...

    Now keep in mind less than 3% of Canadians nation-wide speak French (if you exclude the banana republic of Quebec), so logically, French is not needed anywhere except Quebec, and maybe parts of New Brunswick.

    More Canadians speak Klingon (the mythical language from Star Trek) than French. I think if Canada should have two official languages, we should make it English and Klingon. It would benefit far more people! And Klingons are friendlier than the Quebecois! Ka-pla!

    ReplyDelete
  95. Andre Pratte of La Presse clarifies the issue of trademarks.

    "Jusqu'à maintenant, le gouvernement québécois considérait ces marques de commerce comme hors de la portée de la loi 101 parce que protégées par le droit international. "

    http://www.cyberpresse.ca/debats/editorialistes/andre-pratte/201111/18/01-4469482-affichage-de-montreal-a-paris.php?utm_categorieinterne=trafficdrivers&utm_contenuinterne=cyberpresse_BO40_editoriaux_199_accueil_POS2

    Apparently, up until now the OLF didn't pursue it because these trademarks are under the protection of international law.

    So the gouvernemaman, if it decides to pursue it further, will be in violation of UN conventions, not for he first time ever, but I'm not sure if the Liberals or Legault would want to go there. It would probably take some crazed pequiste like Curzi to do it when in power (hopefully never).

    So all the OLF can do now is apply soft pressure (read: nagging). Other than that, they can't do anything.

    ReplyDelete
  96. And the major question still is: in the countless interviews with Trudel and Beaulieu, and in the countless reports in the last 2-3 weeks about the protests, why hasn't the Quebec media brought up this point? Why didn't they challenge Trudel and Beaulieu in the interviews in regards to international law? I would have loved to see those two try to address that...

    ReplyDelete
  97. Pratte is wrong. There are treaties that Canada is signatory to governing intellectual property but the fundamental reason why the Charter of the French language and the OLF can't touch trade-marks is because the federal government has exclusive jurisdiction over them. It is the same basic reason why Quebec cannot make criminal law or hand out radio frequencies. And the same reason why Alberta could not force Le Chateau to change its name to The Castle, if they were ever silly enough to consider it.

    Trudel and Beaulieu almost certainly know this. They are trying to push the envelope and get franco Quebecois to accept that the present state of affairs is wrong, constitution or no constitution, and the only way out is independence. And there is no point trying to convince someone like Mario Beaulieu otherwise. It's a waste of time so why give a nutter like him an opportunity to wrap himself in the flag and preach about separation. Toujours la meme rengaine.

    ReplyDelete
  98. @Sandy McTire

    Regardless of the law, it's clear to me that people like Beaulieu and Trudel are driven by their anglophobia. In this, they remind me of De Gaulle.

    The saddest thing is that Quebec mainstream media are hitching their wagons to this, and that there is an air of permissiveness and tacit support for this kind of thing in this province.

    ReplyDelete
  99. Mes chers amis,

    je suis desole de constater votre colere...Cependant, j'habite a New York depuis 10 ans et je suis revenue recemment a Montreal pour visiter ma famille en 2012. Evidemment, je voulais me promener dans l'ouest de la ville, alors moi et ma niece nous allons chez Rubens. Aussitot que nous avons commencer a parler en francais les anglophones se retounaient comme si nous etions des talibans...C'est vraiment tres derangant! Quoi si je parle francais dans ma ville natale je suis devenue une etrangere?

    Il vous faut comprendre que oui les francophones sont paranoiaques, mais on a des raisons, nous vivons dans une mer de 330.000,000 d'anglophones...Nous ne somme aucunement contre vous. A la maison nous parlons anglais, mon mari est juif, mais a Montreal je parle francais, c'est normal.

    En fait mes chers Montrealais anglophones, vous devriez etre fier de vivre au sein d'une nation francophone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ! am a French Canadian, born and bred. I grew up in Montreal and then lived abroad for many years. I love the French language and the amazing discoveries it brought to my life. But in my hierarchy of values, I cherish, sponsor and prioritize freedom of expression above it. I recognize the value of promoting the french language, but not at the point of a gun.

      The OQLF is a state sponsored terrorist organization that uses a system of anonymous complaints to terrorize, threaten, pressure, invade privacy, defame and sue its citizens to limit their freedom of expression. Some of their ideological advocates even go as far as using physical violence. As long as the French population continues to support its fascist practices, it will be perceived as a whole as guilty by association.

      I believe one of my duty as a human being on this planet is to support liberty of expression everywhere, including in Quebec and to fight the infringements. The price to pay for liberty is to accept hearing things we don't like. We took a great asset and we made it a liability. La culture c'est comme la confiture, moins on en a, plus on l'étend.

      Delete