Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Denis Lebel Skewers Gilles Duceppe and Bloc Quebecois

In noting that it's been 20 years since the Bloc Quebecois first entered Parliament, Denis Lebel, the Conservative cabinet minister from Roberval-Lac-Saint-Jean tore into the Bloc Quebecois and its leader Gilles Duceppe, in an opinion piece written in the Quebec City Daily le Soleil.

If you read French, take a look at it over HERE.

I'm providing a translation because I think the piece is not only noteworthy but entertaining as well. Outside of Quebec, it seems that the only thing that gets publicity is separatist rants and nationalistic outbursts, but it's important to remember that there are more federalists in Quebec than sovereignists.
Although the Bloc Quebecois hold two-thirds of the seats in Quebec, they did it with only 38% of the vote. We just don't seem to hear from the 62% of Quebeckers who voted for a federalist party.
"August 13 marks the twentieth anniversary of the election of Gilles Duceppe as MP. At the time, he told Radio-Canada: " I had a funny feeling when entering Parliament. I told myself: I'm probably the first one to enter this forum hoping to spend as little time as possible." Link

In 1994, in an interview with La Presse, he added that "Nobody in the Bloc has been elected to make a career out of  it.
Apparently for Gilles Duceppe it's "do as I say and not as I do!"

The Bloc leader has now been in federal politics for 20 years. He'll retire one day with one of the most lucrative pensions ever awarded by the Canadian Parliament. This is particularly ironic, the country that
Duceppe wants to break up, will serve him personally quite well.

Behind this sad anniversary, there is a fundamental issue for Quebeckers. Where do we want Quebec to position itself over the next few years? It's been 20 years since Gilles Duceppe and his troops have wasted Quebec's political capital in Ottawa.

When I hear Mr. Duceppe complain loudly on the issue of representation in the House of Commons because our Conservative government wants to respect the principle of representation by population, I can only reply that it is by electing MPs of a party that aspires to form a government that one can increase the political weight of Quebec.

Breaking the deadlock;

As a former mayor of Roberval, I myself have chosen to make the leap into federal politics because the riding of Roberval - Lac-Saint-Jean was mired in stagnation caused by the Bloc. I decided to submit my candidacy to try to resolve issues once and for all.

Since 1993, the Bloc has enjoyed a majority of the seats in Quebec.
What have they done with this political clout? We know they have made no promises and have delivered nothing.
If Gilles Duceppe was at least able to prevent things, then we could fall back on these minimal results.

However, it is with a Bloc majority that the fiscal imbalance was created and it is thanks to the Harper government that it has been settled. Gilles Duceppe and his party didn't stop the Liberals from stealing from Canadians in the biggest political scandal in Canadian history. The Bloc did not stop the Liberals from
drastically increasing greenhouse emissions and the Bloc did not stop the Liberals from encroaching on provincial jurisdiction.

Mr. Duceppe and his colleagues criticize the government, sitting in the grandstands, but to score goals, you've got to be on the ice.

The weight of the years is beginning to bear heavy on the shoulders of Duceppe. This is obviously a disappointed man that has failed to achieve any of his objectives.

We parliamentarians from Quebec are proud to be Quebeckers who believe in this beautiful country of Canada. We have a duty to continue to work hard, door by door, handshake by handshake, to convince Quebeckers that it would be preferable to have more members on the team that forms the government, in a party whose motives are not dysfunction and quarrels.

Denis Lebel, Conservative MP for Roberval - Lac-Saint-Jean
 
Minister of State for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Region of Quebec "



40 comments:

  1. Mississauga Guy says:

    Gee, Mr. Lebel is creating a make-work project: Actually trying to tell the Real Canada he's working constructively and duh Bloc is not.

    It kills me the CTV National News made more of an issue about Duceppe's 20th anniversary as an M.P. than how a family is getting royally screwed by fascist yet "federalist" Quebec government and having to send half a family to Delaware for the sake of an English education. It took Denis Lebel 20 years to tell the world that duh Bloc leader has been nothing but a humanoid waste of resources that has drained the taxpayers for all they're worth--and not just Quebec taxpayers!

    If another opportunity comes around for Duceppe to jump ship and join the PQ, he'd be crazy to let it go. He's now entitled to his full M.P. pension that is enhanced because he's a party leader. He can quit tomorrow, get parachuted into a PQ bastion (there are no shortages of those, esp. in the backwoods of Quebec) and collect a "mimimal" pension after five years as an MNA. Of course, that "minimal" likely puts him in the top 50% of wage earners, and add his M.P. pension, it puts him in the top 5%!

    Gilles Duceppe reminds me of Uncle Max Dettweiler from the Sound of Music--a leech on Captain Von Trapp's pocketbook and always scheming to make a quick buck. Gilles Duceppe is leeching on the taxpayer and making empty political fodder for a quick headline.

    Then again, Gilles Duceppe represents Quebec for what it has become--a leech on the Real Canada and out to reek havoc wherever they can with complete impudence.

    If the majority of Quebecers are not nationalists/separatists/sovereignists/whatever, it's only because the minority demographic makes it that way. The majority of Québécois pur laine are anti-federalist. Sour Grapes Parasite made a point of labelling his detractors and scapegoats for his referendum loss. He was probably right. About 61% (give-or-take a point or two) of the majority ilk voted "yes" to a ridiculously ambiguous question, but the voter still knew the ramifications of his/her choice.

    Too, it was interesting to see how about 11% of the Chomedey voters didn't know how to cast a ballot properly, and how other predominantly minority ridings also disproportionatly suffered the same level of ignorance.

    Despite all the shenanigans in both 1980 and 1995, the separatists couldn't pull it off...or didn't they? I was living in Quebec for almost all of the PQ's first two mandates. All I heard on the local news was fed bashing, fed bashing and more fed bashing ad nauseam. The language police were in full crusade mode, and Bill 101 was running its search and destroy mission of all things English.

    So here comes Denis Lebel a-roaring and a-charging like a former Captain Canada who we all know what HE is made of. Makes for good conversation, but I don't think there is a true federalist in Roberval...or Lac St-Jean, or Saguenay, Alma (even the Blackburns), Rimouski (except for some hockey players), etc. etc. etc.

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  2. Wow. I wish we had that guy in our riding. Our local Bloc MP has done nothing but send out pamphlets every month or so to announce grandiose plans that never come to fruition. That being said, the local Liberal and Conservative candidates have only themselves to blame for not getting more votes. They barely allow their presence to be known and their message is usually weak; i.e., “elect me because I’ve been in the community for 15 years, I’m a bon pere de famille,” etc. Heck, during the last election, the Conservative candidate refused to even attend a local Town-hall style debate!

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  3. Gilles Duceppe est encore bien populaire au Québec car le Fédéral et les autres provinces n'ont jamais remis le dossier constitutionnel à l'ordre du jour. C'est la politique de l'autruche qui est de mise, on se met la tête dans le sable en espérant que cette idée leur passe. Malheureusement, les partisans du statut quo se rendent bien compte que les problèmes ne sont pas oubliés et encore moins réglés. Le Bloc est encore pertinent puisque les gens votent encore pour lui. Un vote démocratique et qui ne se dément pas depuis... Pour reprendre les termes d'un commentaire provenant du National Post ''Its a shame he is a seperatist, during the election debates he's been in he has always been the most impressive(then again he has had lots of experience).

    He would have made a good prime minister.

    Read more: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2010/08/13/graeme-hamilton-duceppe-celebrates-20-years-of-futility/#ixzz0wyDIvs00
    '' Pour certains, c'est une honte d'être indépendantiste ? Pourquoi appuyer l'indépendance canadienne ? Pourquoi de nouveaux états naissent partout sur la planète ? Sont-ils tous honteux ? La vraie honte c'est de ne jamais répondre aux demandes légitimes d'un des peuples fondateurs du Canada. Lâchez-nous avec les autres, là, il est question du Québec et de sa majorité francophone.

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  4. Notre chef joindra le Parti Québécois (le jour venu) non pas comme ministre mais bien comme Premier Ministre.
    C'est lui qui tranformera notre pauvre province en pays prospère.Tous avons remarqué le charisme de cet homme hors pair et l'habilité innée a manipuler les dollars canadiens en faveur de notre éventuel pays.Vive notre chef!Bravo pour ses 20 ans pouvoir!

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  5. Mississauga Guy here (no doughnuts today, SVP). What Henry above says sadly is typical of too many politicians. Excluding Quebec, Canada is a two-party system, just like in the U.S. The NDP will wait a long, long time to get over 20 seats (if I had it MY way, no seats for the way they're up Premier Goldilock's ass with Bill 103)!

    James Janos, a.k.a. Jesse Ventura, former Minnesota governor and a former mayor pointed out a major democratic deficit is mostly because it's a two-party system and that creates a good ole boy's network. Independent candidates could help, and add the balance of power, but both the U.S. and Canada make it difficult for independents to enter--it's possible, just more hurdles. Ask Howard Galganov.

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  6. "ous avons remarqué le charisme de cet homme hors pair et l'habilité innée a manipuler les dollars canadiens en faveur de notre éventuel pays"

    You mean by blackmail. Duceppe is a champion of welfare for the province of Quebec. Must not feel good to be a backslider living on the backs of other Canadians. Duceppe invented the famed fiscal imbalance. The man is a total fraud.

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  7. I have a question for Quebec separatists:

    If Quebec to proclaim its independence today, who will be your head of state / government?

    The reason I ask this is because even though Quebec nationalists are quite loud in their demand, I never see any tangible struggle or sacrifice from them or their leaders. Nelson Mandela was jailed by the apartheid government. Aung San Suu Kyi is in house arrest. Gandhi lived in poverty. Dalai Lama is in exile. Xanana Gusmao led the guerrilla warfare.

    Duceppe lives in comfort in his federal salary and future pension. In fact, members of BQ support the salary increase for the MPs. Marois lives in $8 mio Chateau Marois. Members of the separatist movement travels with Canadian passport. They make complain to the Fed about anything. They collect EI, they file federal taxes and wait for the checks.

    Struggle for independence? Was is das?

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  8. @Mississauga Guy: Well, I should add that the NDP, The Green Party and one independent were relatively more active in our riding. The Liberal and Conservatives candidates seemed to only show their faces just 24 hours prior to the election. Essentially, they loitered around supermarkets (Loblaws & IGA) and harassed shoppers. Not much of a campaign and they certainly didn’t show any signs that they believed that they had a chance of winning.

    At any rate, it would be refreshing to find a local candidate who would have the guts to publish an op-ed piece like the one penned by Denis Lebel.

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  9. "...I never see any tangible struggle or sacrifice from them or their leaders..."

    Il est obligé de vivre a Ottawa...Si c'est pas un sacrifice.

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  10. To Troy: ''f Quebec to proclaim its independence today, who will be your head of state / government?'' Le chef du gouvernement qui sera au pouvoir au moment de la proclamation d'indépendance. Après, le gagnant des élections suivantes. Pour ce qui est du sacrifice des dirigeants indépendantistes, inutile de mentionner que le cadre québécois est spécifique et que nombre de figures de proue du mouvement n'ont jamais eu droit aux honneurs des sbires du fédéral (voir les Marchand, Lalonde, Trudeau, Chrétien de ce monde). Déjà pour des gens comme Bourgault, Gaston Miron, Hubert Aquin et cie, plusieurs ont payés cher le prix de leurs convictions. Finalement, Gilles Duceppe est élu par les Québécois qui figurez-vous payent des impôts au gouvernement fédéral, il est tout à fait normal qu'il reçoivent un salaire, le mouvement joue le jeu de la démocratie ! Vous êtes comiques, c'est comme si les choix politiques québécois n'étaient pas valables et que l'argent qu'ils envoient devraient seulement servir aux politiciens qui font l'affaire du reste du Canada. Dans le cas de Pauline Marois, ce n'est pas son salaire de politicienne mais bien sa fortune personnelle (voir son mariage) qui a grandement contribué à son haut niveau de vie. Et puis quoi ? Pour être intègre, il faudrait qu'elle vive dans une bicoque ? Elle mène une vie confortable, tant mieux pour elle. Typiquement: né pour un petit pain comme attitude !

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  11. Sous le joug des nationaliste socialiste, Montréal est passer de capitale économique du pays a quatrième derrière, Vancouver, Calgary et Toronto.
    Ou course a plain vitesse vers les maritimes. Pendant ce emp il semble que l'ont fait usage de peur en citing ces fairs. On disait il y aurais un cout economique a tout cela, et on s'est fait rabrouer que l'on exagere. Ok dookay le problèmes est que l'ont a toujours eu raison et que la bande de national socialiste oublie d'admettre qu'il nous mène a la perdition. Vive le Quebec libre du national socialism. On peu rêver.

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  12. Dartagnan: typiques, ça pourrais être pire et être Gatineau. Ou encore pire le lac St.-Jean.

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  13. À anonyme August 18, 2010 5:06 PM: Ce qui a fait passer Montréal de capitale économique à quatrième comme vous dites, c'est le idéaux démocratiques des grandes compagnies qui curieusement ont toutes déménagé leur siège social à Toronto. Et rectification, le national-socialisme n'a jamais été le régime en place au Québec. Mouvement nationaliste oui, sociale-démocratie peut-être. Lorsqu'on ne sait pas les termes qu'on utilise, mieux vaut lire sur ce qu'on avance avant ! Nazis et pourquoi pas Godzilla un coup parti ? Pas sérieux...

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  14. Ce qui a fait passe au quatrième rang n'est oas les corpo, mais le socialisme ardent avec une essence nationaliste, voir Zimbabwe, Venezuela, Cuba et le reste. Garde ta tête bien enfoncer dans le sable, c'est plus facile d'ignorer ka réalité.

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  15. Nationalisme socialisme, yes sir. Nationalisme + socialisme = Quebec ou l'on vit, harel et Landry sont ceux qui utilisais la terminologie, merci de la promouvoir comme tu le faut si bien...mouton.

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  16. Hypocrites, hypocrites, hypocrites, every one of them Liberal, Tory, PQ, BQ, all full of it, all the time. They are trained in spin, BS, lie, propaganda and double speak; oops I almost forgot talking points as well. In other words they are full of shit. Day in and day out, they do not have a clue what they are talking about. Just listen carefully to what they sat and more importantly what they don’t say. Canada has not been a democracy since the late 1960”s when they started pushing for racist, bigoted, anti-English language laws in kebec. Turd-o and his gang of bigots arrived in Ottawa and mess began. 5 decades of massive government growth, debt…just a bloody mess. Poor Canada. Thanks Turd-o, Tanks Kebec.

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  17. 40 ans de futilité, de syndicalisme ardent, de socialisme et d'étatisme et il comprend toujours pas. C'est la faute de tous sauf de ces politiques, quel beau festival d'autruche. Et le twist qui fait dans le Normand lester, et commente comme quoi nos femme dont plus belle que les anglo, wow sort du Quebec, elle sont belle mais pas unique. Et ça rentre pas dans PIB ça :)

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  18. Its too bad the Bloc wasn't around in Trudeau's day. He wouldn't have been kept in power by the Quebecois tribal vote. The Toronto Guy.

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  19. Le nationalisme canadien: La plus belle chose du monde. Le nationalisme québécois: la chose la plus laide. Franchement, vous avez un sérieux problème de cohérence. Ce qui est bon pour l'un est bon pour l'autre.

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  20. Trudeau: Pire trou de cul, à la réputation surfaite. Un fendant de première. Et lui ses millions ?

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  21. Tordant tu me décrit comme nationaliste canadien LOL ça démontre le filtre par lequel tu vois les gens. Je suis pour la liberté des individus, pas nationaliste. Je ne renie pas les écossais qui on bâtit Montréal, je les admire. pas le nationalisme, mouton va, tu va nous citer quelque chose du genre coloniser après cela? Sors du bol a poisson, ou devrais-je dire du chaudron a homard ou Jacques t'a plonger.

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  22. Et j'oubliais le nationalisme québécois est baser dur le pur lainisme, le nationalisme canadien sur le multi culturanisme, méchante différence,et si je me souviens bien les nationalisme étais 100% contre ce multi culturalisme, car cela étais une arme contre les pur laine. Bref le nationalisme canadien est mandatement plus inclusif que le nationalisme québécois, des efforts ont été fait pour changer cela, mais le reste le même, voir Landry et Parizeau en 95. Landry s'en ai mandatement bien tirez après ce qu'il a fait, merci au média québécois.

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  23. Si vous pensez que le nationalisme canadien est plus inclusif, tant mieux pour vous. Par contre, il semble exclure les Québécois selon vos propos ?

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  24. "Si vous pensez que le nationalisme canadien est plus inclusif"

    Je pense tres bon, sans les Quebecois.

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  25. Le nationalisme, canadien, québécois, allemand, russe, chinois, name it, c'est le cancer de l'humanité.

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  26. À anonyme August 19, 2010 10:47 PM : Vous êtes vraiment inclusif, j'ai quasiment envie de rester ! Continuez à faire l'inverse de ce que vous prônez !

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  27. À derteilzeitberliner : Je suis bien d'accord avec vous, surtout lorsqu'il est exacerbé. Par contre, les Québécois ne sont pas très nationalistes en général et sûrement pas trop fiers... Un petit peu plus de patriotisme ne ferait pas de mal dans un Québec ou seul le dollar est le leitmotiv. D'accord, mais ce que les statistiques enseignent c'est seulement l'importance que les Québécois donnent à leur langue: le français. Vivre en français et faire perdurer celle-ci sur le territoire, c'est tout ! Et non, ça ne veut pas dire ne pas apprendre d'autres langues, etc. Mais être comme tous les endroits de la planète, avoir une langue commune.

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  28. derteilzeitberliner: "Le nationalisme, canadien, québécois, allemand, russe, chinois, name it, c'est le cancer de l'humanité. "

    "Nationalism is an infantile disease. It's the measles of mankind." -Albert Einstein, 1933

    We must also differentiate between nationalism and patriotism. And admit that what we see in Quebec is mostly nationalism - exclusive, aggressive, invasive, interfering. The best distinction between the two, for me, has been made by Orwell, in his Notes on Nationalism in 1945:

    "By 'nationalism'... I mean the habit of identifying oneself with a single nation or other unit, placing it beyond good and evil and recognising no other duty than that of advancing its interests. Nationalism is not to be confused with patriotism. Both words are normally used in so vague a way that any definition is liable to be challenged, but one must draw a distinction between them, since two different and even opposing ideas are involved. By 'patriotism' I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality."

    -----

    The quotes of these great men from over half a century ago prove one thing - humanity might be evolving technologically, but not ethically or socially. Francis Fukuyama's "The End of History and the Last Man", written in 1992 in euphoria over the demise of communism, was premature and unreasonable. Shortly after the collapse of communism, a war broke out in former Yugoslavia that was fuelled by various ethnic nationalisms in the region. Today, even Fukuyma admits he made a mistake and jumped to wrong conclusions.

    For a great take on war and nationalism, I recommend "War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning" by an excellent reporter and long-time war correspondent for the NYT (the paper which he was forced to leave after voicing his opposition to the 2003 invasion of Iraq) Chris Hedges. The title Chapter 2 says it all: "The Plague of Nationalism".

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  29. À adski: Justement, votre différenciation entre patriotisme et nationalisme explique bien la dichotomie qui s'opère au Canada et au Québec. Les indépendantistes québécois veulent conserver leurs particularités (lire: une société française ouverte sur le monde (Oui, ça existe être ouvert sur le monde dans une autre langue que l'anglais !)) et leur façon de vivre. De son côté le reste du Canada veut imposer SA vision au Québec, avec des termes comme ceux utilisés par certains blogueurs de ce site ''...Dany Williams will put Québec at is proper place...'' Et la qui doit décider de la place du Québec, mis-à-part les Québécois ? Le ROC ? Je ne suis pas certain de cela... Enfin ! « L’indépendance, ce n’est pas une récompense, c’est une responsabilité. » — Pierre Bourgault

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  30. « L’indépendance, ce n’est pas une récompense, c’est une responsabilité. » — Pierre Bourgault

    Que dire de plus?sinon,merci pour votre intervention!Très bon résumé de la situation.

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  31. "Les indépendantistes québécois veulent conserver leurs particularités (lire: une société française ouverte sur le monde (Oui, ça existe être ouvert sur le monde dans une autre langue que l'anglais !)) et leur façon de vivre."

    The following article "Shutting out the world" at the National Post is an excellent response to the quoted statement:

    http://www.nationalpost.com/Shutting+world/3110013/story.html

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  32. Au lieu d'en vouloir à tout le monde, commencez donc par apprendre le français ! Si vous intégrer à une communauté francophone vous dérange à ce point, le Canada est vaste, vous trouverez un endroit qui vous convient, j'en suis certain. Mais s'il vous plaît, arrêtez de penser que le monde anglo-saxon est le plus ouvert sur la différence et le monde, c'est un mirage véhiculé par Hollywood et le multiculturalisme à la Trudeau. Être ouvert sur l'anglais n'égale pas être ouvert sur le monde, la nuance est importante. Parlons musique par exemple: Pourquoi les anglos-saxons (en apparence et selon les chiffres) ne consomment que rarement de la musique s'exprimant dans une autre langue que l'anglais ? « Quand nous défendons le français chez nous, ce sont toutes les langues du monde que nous défendons contre l’hégémonie d’une seule. » — Pierre Bourgault

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  33. "Être ouvert sur l'anglais n'égale pas être ouvert sur le monde, la nuance est importante. "

    In this day and age, this statement is false. Since English is the world's lingua franca, you can't talk of being open to THE WORLD if you're not open to the English language. You can still be an open minded person without English, but you can't be "worldly" without it.

    English is not my first language so I didn't make the rules - if I could make the rules, I'd have made my language the lingua franca so I wouldn't have to learn another language. And since English is pretty much grounded as the lingua franca for decades to come, the non-Anglophones have very few choices - they can either 1.get it over with and learn the damn thing, or 2.not learn it and instead learn to live with the consequences. Quebec nationalists seem to prefer the third "alternative" - 3. not learn it and bicker about the consequences.

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  34. « Quand nous défendons le français chez nous, ce sont toutes les langues du monde que nous défendons contre l’hégémonie d’une seule. » —Pierre Bourgault

    This statement by Bourgault is cynical and dishonest - his cynism, hypocrisy, and trickery are all encapsulated in it. These people are not defending "other languages", in fact they don't give a rat's ass about them. It's about French, French, French.

    Case in point – the last Winter Olympics in Vancouver. There was quite a lot of bickering in the Francophone press about "not enough French" at the ceremonies. Interestingly, there was also bickering about there being too much Mandarin/Cantonese and Hindu/Punjabi via-a-vis French. The truth came out and was served to us sceptics on a silver platter - this isn't about "linguistic equality", this is about me, me, me.

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  35. @adski

    Est-ce que le Mandarin et et Punjabi sont des langues officielle du Canada ? Si oui,c'est tout nouveau.Saviez-vous que le Français est la langue officielle des jeux olympiques.Vous êtes très mal informé sur votre pays cher ami.

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  36. À Adski: C'est vous qui le dite, si l'ouverture sur le monde c'est parler l'anglais (phrase dite par un anglophone), comment un anglophone s'ouvre-t-il sur le monde, supposant que cela demande un certain niveau de curiosité intellectuelle ? Ah non, c'est vrai, tous les anglophones sont ouverts sur le monde, c'est vrai, j'avais oublié...

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  37. "Est-ce que le Mandarin et et Punjabi sont des langues officielle du Canada ? Si oui,c'est tout nouveau.Saviez-vous que le Français est la langue officielle des jeux olympiques. "

    No, they aren't. So cut the crap about promoting "linguistic diversity" and defending all languages against "hegemony" of one. And stop quoting that cynical and ridiculous line by Bourgault.

    Or, alternatively, quote Bourgault BUT when other languages are showcased at events, celebrate this fact and cut the crap about French being the official language.

    But don't do both, because we you do, you serve us nothing but yet another contradiction: "We champion and promote linguistic diversity...but...French is the official language so French, French, French..."

    Pick one and stick with it.

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  38. @Adski

    Je crois que vous êtes incapable de lire un texte en Français correctement de façon a en comprendre les subtilités,n'est-ce pas?
    Je vais simplifié...suivez bien cette fois-ci:
    Nous défendons la diversité dans le monde mais les spécificités chez-nous.Est-ce assez clair?

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  39. "Nous défendons la diversité dans le monde mais les spécificités chez-nous."

    Nothing is ever clear with you guys, for you choose to meander between different topics, connect the unconnactable, and contradict yourselves, and do it all with a straight face (i.e. cynically).

    Your last statement reeks not only of falsehood, but also megalomania. You’re defending diversity in the world? Pardon me, but who in the world cares about what you have to say? When did Quebec become a world superpower, able to influence world events? I must have missed that grand transformation from a backwater province into a world superpower...

    And why would you be so concerned with the “diversity” in the world, if you are killing it in your own backyard? What kind of hypocrites are you?

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  40. Savez-vous Adski que si j'avais été l'agent d'immigration en charge de votre dossier,vous seriez retourné illico dans votre container.
    Que faites-vous donc parmi nous?

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