Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The True Effect Of Language Intolerance

I'll let you in on a little secret, my shopping street of choice is a stretch of Somerled Avenue (a good Scottish name) in the NDG (Notre Dame de Grace) district of Montreal.

This isn't the more affluent yuppified neighborhood of NDG bordering Monkland Ave, it's more of a transition area that leads to the decidedly working class area around Cavendish/Benny Farm.
For the benefit of those unfamiliar with the area, it is home to a chunk of Montreal's Anglo black community, most hailing from the Caribbean islands, as well as other anglos and francophones members of the lower middle and working class. It still remains about ⅔ anglophone, the community's history reflected in the name of the streets and schools.

I shop there because there's a bunch of small merchants that I love to encourage, patronizing locals is something that I take as a personal source of pride.

Seen on Somerled- My all-time favorite sign!
My greengrocer of choice is run by a lovely extended Tamil family, who various members toil seven days a week from early morning to God knows how late. The sisters man the cash, the husbands do the heavy lifting and on the weekend, the ladies are given off to attend to family matters, while the men take over.
They speak perfect English which they learned in school back in Sri Lanka and yes, they have started to master French quite well.
They always advise me on the ripeness of cantaloupes and are never wrong. I would never shop elsewhere.
Lately I've noticed a 'Canadianized' teenager who is starting to help out as well. He goes to French school as per Bill 101, but somehow speaks perfect English. No doubt a Dawson and McGill candidate in a couple of years!
There's a bilingual poster on the glass door advising customers about something or other concerning the NDG food co-op. I hope the OQLF and their minions of frustrated retards don't complain.

Across the street there is a government SAQ (liquor monopoly), which believe it or not, offers English speakers a first rate service.
A mixture of bilingual anglophone and francophones work there and none of them are hung up on language, speaking to the clients in the language of choice, where the familiar Montreal greeting of Bonjour/Hi still reigns supreme.
Documents and literature are all available in English and the translations are excellent, done by native English speakers, you can tell.
Hats off to the SAQ, the most English friendly service of the government.

Weather permitting, on the terrace of the bar across the street, gruffy patrons lounge over a beer or sometimes, but rarely, a glass of wine. They discuss the affairs of the day bilingually and rage against each other in the language of Shakespeare and Moliere.
Back across the street is a little grocery store run by Russians which features eastern European specialties.
I particularly enjoy selecting from the ten or twelve varieties of frozen perogies which I pick up from time to time.
The clerks speak wonderful English and French, all with an adoring thick Russian accent. I always say "Zarosevo d-nja!"(Have a nice day!) before I leave.

Sadly, the M&Ms franchise just next door is closed, the family which bought the franchise likely  losing their life savings on a failed Canadian dream.
Let's face it, this isn't the district for fancy frozen expensive food and the company should have known it. It falls on the small investor, essentially buying a job, to take the fall for a marketing error.

Life is unforgiving in the retail marketplace and everyone's business on the street here is tenuous.
A couple of bad weeks and.....well.
Alas a Subway franchise has taken over and I hope the owner ekes out a living. So far it doesn't look too busy.

Down the street is a pizza joint that is busy. It serves cheap food, two slices for the price of one. I don't know if the owner is English, French or Greek, he toils in the back whipping out the pies while a young bilingual counter clerk serves out the plates.
It's a favorite of the area's young Anglophone black community and working class families.

Across the street from the pizza store is a Chinese food counter where you can order takeout. I haven't bought anything there in years, but back then, the Chinese cook (a one-man-show) didn't speak much English or French. You pointed out the dishes you wanted on the menu, which he cooked up right in front of you.
One thing I can say, even those who don't speak English or French understand the universal language of money and all can ring up a register and give proper change!

Here in this part of NDG, people are not wealthy, but rich in culture.

They don't care or think much about language, because almost all are bilingual.The immigrants are learning English and French, on the job. Some have more difficulty than others, but it doesn't matter when clients and neighbors are of good will.

The last time I was in the SAQ a francophone patron helped out an elderly English couple, by carrying out a heavy box of booze to the car. On this street, people are down to Earth and generally kind and cooperative.

It's the kind of district where you can overhear that quintessential Montreal conversation, the one where one half of the conversation is in French and the other in English. Alternately, there's the conversation where the speaker actually switches mid-sentence between languages.
And of course, many of us have had the experience of addressing someone in French and receiving a reply in French, only to realize that both are English!
This happens to me in the Rona Hardware on St. Jacques all the time!
Ah NDG!

It's a down to Earth part of town where people don't get hung up over language and transact with each other ignoring the differences,
When your store of choice is Dollarama (just down the street), you're not going to bitch about a clerk who has a bit of trouble with your language.
You're also not apt to complain about someone serving you who is wearing a Hijab, Turban, Sari or someone who sports a distracting piercing.
It's cruelly ignoble to complain about someone who is grinding it out for minimum wage, just trying to bring in a few bucks to help make ends meet..

This is NDG.....the impossible dream.
If you choose to live here it is because you are a 'live and let live' sort of person. You enjoy diversity and take pride in your bilingualism.

Why am I telling you this story of a nice street with nice merchants and similarly nice customers?

Because this is the street that the two punks from the SSJB decided to terrorize.

One of the merchants they decided to 'teach a lesson', is another fruit and vegetable store, all for the unpardonable sin of posting a copy of an English newspaper advertisement which the store had run, heralding the specials of the week.

Here is a picture of the sign over the grocery store that got the young SSJB rat boys so worked up.
I don't know what upset them so much, there's actually a descriptor in front of the name of the store,  just like the liars at the OQLF pretend that is required.

Oh oh! There it is !
Now I see the problem, do you?


As people try to scratch out an honest living, many working twelve and fourteen hour days, the intrusion by language rats is just another reason in the long list of the many hardships faced and why 25% of immigrants leave Quebec shortly after arriving here.

Quebec nationalists and those critical of this blog continue to peddle the fantasy that Quebec is open and welcoming to immigrants as long as they speak French.
The language issue is just the most visible aspect of the ethnocentrism that is the fabric of Quebec society which is bolstered by the constant bashing of the English language and the religious customs, dress and culture of immigrants.
The constant reminder of the Us/Them syndrome has left Quebec a polarized and unforgiving society.

Just this week the Montreal police were again sanctioned for racial profiling and ordered to pay an Arab businessman $18,000 for harassment. You'd think this stuff was something from the 1950's, but it's par for the course as police continue their war on minorities. Read how the city of Montreal 'handles' these cases. Link

What French language bashers fail to understand or care, is that there is someone on the receiving end of their vitriol. Someone who honestly means no harm and is just trying to make a living.

Here on Somerled Avenue, it isn't corporate Quebec/Canada that is being attacked, rather vulnerable micro businesses that are the soft and easy target that language militants like to attack.
An immigrant breaking the language laws represents the perfect villain for Benoît Dutrizac and company.
Like a hunt on the Serengeti, the language militants adhere to the policy of going after the weakest of the herd.
It is nothing short of sickening.

I'll say it again, when that young Black SSJB volunteer who terrorized the neighborhood grows up and realizes that even with his French, he is a second class citizen, it will be a rude and sad awakening.

 **************************
Readers, in order to encourage commenters to adopt screen names,  I'll be putting up this announcement periodically;

103 comments:

  1. Editor, you wrote: "Like a hunt on the Serengeti, the language militants adhere to the policy of going after the weakest of the herd."

    Uhhhh...yeah, um hmm...naturally, bullies always sniff out their prey. It's the path of least resistance. Tell us something new. Well...maybe that's asking too much because this has been their modus operandi since the PQ was first elected and ENCOURAGED overt racism against minorities. Same old s**t, different day, bigger shovel. The shovel will grow ever bigger as there seems to be no end to this vile behaviour that is not discouraged by the government. "Let bad enough alone" seems to be the prevailing sentiment of Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest and his minions. What else can one conclude? That rat bastard of a premier is doing sweet f**k-all to stop it!

    Then again, the minorities are to blame because they keep voting that bastard of a son of a bitch! It's like asking a Jew from the Holocaust if he prefers being shot in the head and thrown into an open mass grave, or gassed in makeshift showers, cremated and remains thrown into an open mass grave.

    As for the Montreal and Quebec police (the latter at one time referred to as Duplessis' Good Squad, and let's face it, pretty much still are), this is out of the 50s à la small town sherriffs in the former hick states of the Confederacy because racism and hatred of minorities is overtly and strongly encouraged.

    Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest is just as guilty as the bullies who perpetrate these acts because he sits with his thumb deep up his rectum while the perpetrators are doing their thing. How many of these bullies have been arrested and brought to justice over these vitriolic acts? I hypothesize NONE!

    On the flip side, the minorities are to blame as well, for constantly voting for Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest. It legitimizes him to continue to do sweet f**k all about all this because he gets the votes without having to lift a finger...i.e., go down the path of least resistance. The people in the English speaking ridings who vote for impotent Quislings and Kabos like Kathleen Weil get exactly what they deserve. They may as well start an organization called Jews for Hitler or Croatians for Milosovic. The people who should be fighting Premier John James "Goldilocks" Charest, the rat bastard that he is for sitting idly by while this all happens, foolhardily are VOTING for him and keeping it going like the ugly vicious cycle that it is.

    No matter...I solved MY problem: I left, got my Montreal lady and life partner to come over and they'll NEVER THINK of going back except for occasional visits with family and friends. My stepdaughter calls Ontario her Viagra - her words, not mine!

    Unless and until the minorities in Quebec fight back, don't expect any improvement - in fact, expect a bad situation to get worse!

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    1. All these recent cases of such bold, blatant and unabashed acts of racism are just further proof of what I've been saying for so many years. That is, that Quebec's situation is dangerously similar to that of Poland and Germany in the 1930's. And this is Montreal's POLICE FORCE, officers of the law sworn to protect and serve the public! (or perhaps only to protect one segment of the public from les autres?). These are not isolated incidents, it has wide spread, and how lovely it is that in Quebec, AND ONLY QUEBEC, the police investigate themselves when things go questionable. That's like a crook being asked to be the judge and jury for himself after committing a crime. Sorry, but I'm starting to see police in this province as more Brown Shirts like-thugs-in-training than officers of the law.

      We have blame being pointed at a specific group based, and regardless of how "integrated" you are in Quebec society, you are still not welcome and to blame for all the faults and shortcomings of this province. I've never seen things stirred up to this level before, with constant reports on French TV, radio, newspapers and magazines about the growing English and ethnic problem. So we have the public being stirred up, the police unsympathetic and seemingly as dangerous themselves as Brown Shirts, and at the very top...Premier Charest pretty much just giving the whole situation a thumbs up. Plus when I see how violent student protests have gotten over something as trivial as price hikes in education (or the hockey riots last year), imagine what will happen when the same groups of people start blaming les autres for all their problems.

      I'm telling you, this is going to end up very ugly, and rather soon. I no longer feel safe living in Quebec, I feel like I'm on the edge of rumbling volcano that might blow at any moment. I've stayed here far too long and can't wait for that day I get out.

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    2. Here on Somerled Avenue, it isn't corporate Quebec/Canada that is being attacked, rather vulnerable micro businesses that are the soft and easy target that language militants like to attack.

      So, what's new?
      Insecure people of inferior intellect pick on weaker innocents to boost their own ego and self-esteem. Frenchy-bullies are trained to feel threatened and paranoid, so being xenophobic allows them to shake off their feelings of being insignificant and impotent.

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    3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  2. NDG is the SSJB's worst nightmare. A functional neighbourhood that works in both Canada's official languages. It goes against their whole narrative that the two linguistic groups cannot occupy the same space.

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  3. The SSJB is a discriminatory organization run by a bunch of thugs, no matter what they say, or how much they may deny it. People left to their own accord always find a way to get along and bridge their differences. Leave these merchants alone; they work hard, and they're making an honest living.

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    1. "The SSJB is a discriminatory organization run by a bunch of thugs"

      Mais nous les aimons et les encourageons parce qu'ils représentent les yeux et les oreilles du Québec sur le terrain.Ils sont aussi une source d'informations indispensables pour nos médias.Sans eux les Québécois des régions ne seraient pas en mesure de constater l'anglicisation grimpante de notre ville.

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    2. Anglicization of Montreal, another SSJB perpetuated MYTH! What's going on in Montreal is called White Flight, look it up.

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    3. "l'anglicisation grimpante de notre ville"

      So sad to hear such ignorance in this day and age. Someone needs to wake this imbecile up to the fact that throughout large parts of its history, including during the period when it was the economic engine of Canada and a beacon for international immigrants, Montreal was a majority English-speaking city. Absent a vibrant English-speaking parallel society (because that's what it is, a "society", not a "community", in the same way as French is West of Quebec), Montreal would fade into irrelevance. The war against Quebec English-speaking society has already led to the economic eclipse of Montreal by Toronto. If these idiots got their way, it would decline further to the point of becoming a more populous version of Sherbrooke or Granby.

      Montreal's distinctiveness is to be found in the existence therein of two large, vibrant, demographically self-sustaining, parallel societies, who occasionally meet in the middle, but whose members are able to exist, thrive culturally and economically, in their own part of Quebec and Canadian society. I'm an English-speaking Canadian whose ancestors has been living in Quebec for centuries. Some of those ancestors were German speaking, some English speaking, some French speaking. For the most part, I never sample anything to do with the French side of Quebec society. I don't need to. As an English-speaker I have basically unlimited access to the world's dominant culture, whose cultural offerings I deem superior in every essential respect to what is produced in French-speaking Quebec. I'm not limited to Bowser & Blue or performances at the Centaur theatre, whose cultural offerings I find as parochial and of middling quality as those produced by French-speaking Quebecers. That's what French-Canadian Quebecers need to get through their thick skulls; we live in an open world, and our preferred language enables us to pick and choose the most interesting culture offerings from everywhere, the majority of which are in the English language.

      As for the two punks, what is needed now is a concerted effort on the part of the local NDG community to meet these thugs head on as they slither on the sidewalks and, if seen, vigourously escort them out of the neighbourhood. Like most of their ilk, once confronted face-on, they will run like the cowards that they are.

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    4. Anonymous Apr 25, 2012 08:11 AM: You're falling rightinto Anonymous Apr 25, 2012 06:15 AM's trap. He is a blog troll, a s**t disturber and you're giving him a wall to bounce his ball. The best thing to do is ignore these trolls.

      As for NDG, there should be some sort of neighbourhood watch to harrass these trolls when they appear so they'll run away if confronted. Most bullies do when confronted.

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  4. As you know, all things are composed of two faces: a form and a substance. MontrEal's form is French (=pseudo-French, kébékuo' run-down style, just to please a bunch of functionally illiterate, narrow-minded, pusillanimous nitwits), but the core, the essence, the substance, the vibrating source of real life is and will always be profoundly and proudly English. In fact, to get 99,99% of jobs in MontrEal, you must speak English. Life is hard.

    WA

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    1. "In fact, to get 99,99% of jobs in Montréal"

      Jusqu'au jour ou nous serons un pays.En attendant nous avons de plus en plus de pouvoir...

      Un gros merci à Michael et Justin pour leur appuie.

      la vita è bella :D

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    2. "Jusqu'au jour ou nous serons un pays"
      not gonna happen, never ever...maybe in your weird dreams. Your battle is lost.

      "En attendant nous avons de plus en plus de pouvoir..."
      In fact, to get a decent job, you must speak other than Joual. Not only that: many Montreal-based companies don't even hire Joaul-speakers...Oops...What a pity!

      "la vita è bella"
      Not if it's yours

      WA

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    3. "not gonna happen, never ever...maybe in your weird dreams. Your battle is lost."

      Nous en sommes presque un,encore quelques pouvoirs arrachés d'ottawa et boom!
      En attendant nous demandons la coopération des petits marchands et commerçants de toutes origines pour que nos lois soient respectées,surtout celles qui ont trait à la langue d'affichage afin de maintenir et de préserver le Caractère unique de Montréal.Le français fait de notre ville un milieu culturel et économique sans pareil en amérique,profitons-en!

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    4. You are absolutely disillusioned and 100% detached from the reality in MontrEal, but, if you your state makes you a happy (I doubt it) human being, go ahead with that.

      WA

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    5. @ AnonymousApr 25, 2012 05:59 AM

      You said: "Jusqu'au jour ou nous serons un pays.En attendant nous avons de plus en plus de pouvoir..."

      Funny, there is this other country that is even more French than Quebec, and they're having a hard time with English in the workplace. Hmmm....FAIL!

      http://www.worldcrunch.com/oh-mon-dieu-english-invades-french-workplace/5075

      I guess having your own country just won't cut it, now will it?

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    6. Contrairement aux autres pays francophones (non ceinturés d'anglos),nous avons développé une expertise qui a fait ses preuves.La France n'est même pas en mesure de franciser ses anglos alors que nous,oui.Nous sommes blindés.

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    7. @anon 12:12

      "Contrairement aux autres pays francophones (non ceinturés d'anglos),nous avons développé une expertise qui a fait ses preuves.La France n'est même pas en mesure de franciser ses anglos alors que nous,oui.Nous sommes blindés."

      Thats easy to do when the Rest of Canada pays 8 billion in Equalization alone. SO Quebec doesn't care how many jobs it kills due to bill 101.

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    8. No, it's not a matter of francising the Anglos in France, it's the reality that people in Europe need to speak English to communicate with other European countries. France is in the middle of Europe, and even though there are loads of other languages in Europe, I'm afraid that English has become the common lingua franca in Europe. The irony is that the French invaded England in 1066 and the Norman French took over the English language and francicised it. A century later, the same thing is happening, this time in reverse.

      This is the case in most industries, but in the aerospace industry it's particularly so. My husband worked at Airbus and other aerospace companies in Germany and France and at an aerospace company in Italy. You couldn't get employed (except in a lowly cleaning or technical job) without being able to speak a decent amount of English at any of these companies and the workplace language in all of them is English. There are more and more industries where companies have to rely on specialised employees who only work there for a few years or less before moving onto the next contract, before they have had time to sufficiently learn the language of that country, or where the divisions are in different countries or where the use of English is vitally necessary to communicate with suppliers, subcontractors and clients in other countries.

      The fact that an independent Quebec would be surrounded by Anglophone countries would make it just as necessary for people in any position of dealing with the outside world to speak English, whether or not French is the first language here. Or do you envision businesses in Quebec only dealing with other businesses in Quebec? That's the kind of thing that people do to other countries to bring them down through economic sanctions, not to their own.

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    9. We routinely have an exchange student from France at my institution, and to graduate from their program they need to pass an English exam. Try to do the same in Québec...

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    10. Les Français (65 000 000) sont en position de force en Europe.Les Québécois représentent à peine 2% de l'amérique.Anglos...À vos calculatrices!

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    11. I said 100 years later in my posting above...I meant 1000 years later!

      BTW, I wonder whether this statement is written with deliberate irony and I mistakenly took it seriously? I'm learning French, but I still haven't gotten the point of understanding humorous nuances:

      "Contrairement aux autres pays francophones (non ceinturés d'anglos),nous avons développé une expertise qui a fait ses preuves.La France n'est même pas en mesure de franciser ses anglos alors que nous,oui.Nous sommes blindés."

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    12. "BTW, I wonder whether this statement is written with deliberate irony"

      Non aucune ironie.Pas de place pour les blagues sur la langue au Québec.

      "France and at an aerospace company in Italy."

      Chanceux votre mari car c'est précisément dans ces deux pays que l'on retrouve les plus belles femmes d'Europe.

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    13. Sad to say but there is no humourous nuance there whatsoever. It totally sounds deliberately ironic but take my word for it, it is not. It is typical of some small-minded people here who enjoy to hit-and-run with inflammatory comments. Please beware and don't feed the trolls.

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    14. @CathApr 25, 2012 04:28 PM

      Sad to say but there is no humourous nuance here whatsoever. I know it totally sounds like deliberate irony but it is not, take my word for it. It is an example of the small-mindedness that really does exist here. As you can see, some people take pleasure in leaving anonymous hit-and-run inflammatory posts. Please beware and don’t feed the trolls.

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    15. @CathApr 25, 2012 04:28 PM

      Sad to say but there is no humourous nuance here whatsoever. I know it totally sounds like deliberate irony but it is not, take my word for it. It is an example of the small-mindedness that really does exist here. As you can see, some people take pleasure in leaving anonymous hit-and-run inflammatory posts. The best response is no response.

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    16. @anonymous

      "Chanceux votre mari car c'est précisément dans ces deux pays que l'on retrouve les plus belles femmes d'Europe."

      My husband obviously doesn't share your taste - he says they are in Germany and Ireland. Must be why he married me - I'm half Irish.

      @the Cat - it does seem weird to me that a group of people would collectively shoot themselves in the knee by imposing economic sanctions on themselves. I suppose that paranoia and ideology wipe away all reason.

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    17. Yes, indeed. I don't know how long you've been living here but really, it all has to do with emotion rather than reason. (Was that an arrow in the knee? Sorry, a little Skyrim reference there...)

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    18. LOL, I think my kids' Skyrim references have led me to mix my metaphors.

      I've been here two years and it is slowly starting to catch onto me that reason just doesn't enter into it. I encountered the same thing in Germany with the issue of homeschooling.

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  5. You hit the nail on the head. What you describe is exactly what is going on in most multi-cultural neighbourhoods in Montreal and Laval. That's why those SSJB fascists went and terrorised the NDG & CDN neighbourhoods. And then went on TV and got the media to glorify their actions. No shame. Nobody in the media that I noticed even challenged them for their actions. No government to step in and stop it. No police to help the victims either. They all joined the hate parade, and encourage even more hate.

    Just in the last two weeks or so, we have seen the SSJB target ethnics and anglos in the NDG/CDN Borough. Meanwhile, in the Outremont Borough, they have banned religious celebrations for the next few months. This mainly to target the Hasidic community in that borough. In consequence other religious groups also get swepted up in the mess as well. Such as, not allowing a Russian Orthodox church to hold it's annual Easter celebrations. These examples are just to show readers outside of Montreal and Quebec just what is going on in this place. Oh, I forgot to mention the attach on Jewish owned cottages just north of Laval. Swastikas, and nasty comments spray painted on the attacked homes.

    You see, not a week goes by in Quebec where religious, ethnic, and language minorities are not attacked. The french media glorifies it. And the rest of Canada has it's head up it's ass pretending this is not going on.

    But the real question in all of this is, where do groups such as the SSBJ get their money to finance their operations.

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    1. That's why WE - allophones, anglophones and immigrants from wherever country - should be working together, talking to each other, building a bridge to each other, not AGAINST somebody, but to protect ourselves FROM somebody. We are the real Montreal, anyway.

      WA

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  6. What I think is that the separatist groups (MQF, SSJB, Imperatif, RRQ, et al.) and the OQLF need to be called out about the contents of the complaints. Are they making up the law as they are going or not?

    Reading Bill 101, I can not find the part where bilingual services or information is prohibited. What the law prescribes is that French needs to be put in the dominant position. The Federal Government complies with this requirement by putting French on top or to the left of English on all bilingual signage they have. Also, there is requirement that government services be provided in French, but there is no prohibition that governments provide services in other language(s) beyond French.

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    1. English services aren't prohibited under 101, far from it. It's supposed to be a law that guarantees services in French at least, not French-only. It's baffling to see the OQLF going after towns that have the temerity of offering bilingual services.

      As for the vigilantes, I don't have very high intellectual expectations of thugs who would abase themselves with that behaviour.

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    2. "English services aren't prohibited under 101, far from it."

      Yannick, the problem is that so many people take liberty with this law, that it's irrelevant what it prohibits or doesn't prohibit. Take the issue of the "descriptor". It's not required by the law, but that didn't stop the militants in cooperation with the mainstream media to make a case out of it, with no word of opposition from any major institution (save for one timid comment in a LaPresse column that descriptors might not be required after all, but a more careful analysis of 101 has to be done).

      Take the picture from this latest piece: Fruterie "Green Canadian". A registered trademark WITH a (non-required) descriptor. Did it stop the SSJB punks? No.

      So the problem with 101 is not so much the letter of the law, but the "spirit" of the law and the mythology that grew around it. The problem is the kind of effect it has on people, on the relations between people, and the kind of excuse it offers for unethical behavior. People like M.Beaulieu always justify their actions by invoking 101, effectively shifting the blame on their targets for not adhering to the law.

      Also, the fact that 101 is a sacred cow that cannot be criticized shows that 1. it wouldn't have a leg to stand on when faced with counter-arguments, 2. it has a kind of godly mythical status with its adherents, which makes it more than just a law. It's more like a religion.

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    3. Strangely enough I find myself agreeing with you. In any other society the press, government and officials would all be trampling each other in a mad dash to condemn this behavior.

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    4. First of two:

      Adski, you've hit the nail right on the head. 1960: The Quiet Revolution begins. Parishioners abandon the Roman Catholc Church in droves with the majority of Quebec society, the common herd, having heard enough of the Church's false doctrines. What to believe in? What to do on Sunday mornings and what meat to cook for Friday supper? All leaving the common herd at loose ends, unsure what to believe in next.

      Circa 1967: French teachers and other French language nationalists fear for their jobs figuring immigrants and non-French speakers will not send their children to English school. Job protection becomes a major concern. What to do?

      Caveat: Non-Catholics cannot attend Catholic schools (and I fell into that set of circumstances). All French schools are Catholic thus, ergo and therefore, non-Catholics can't even obtain an instructional French education. What to do?

      Circa 1969: Bill 62, the first language legislation in Quebec is tabled and fails. Bill 63 makes amendments acceptable for enough of the National Assembly to pass the Bill. Riots break out in certain neighbourhoods with significan immigrant populations.

      July 31, 1974: Bill 22 becomes law under a so-called federalist Quebec government. My mind is made up to leave Quebec that very summer upon completion of my cheap Quebec education. Took my first summer job. Knowledge of French barely necessary, except one delivery driver mouthing off at me with his tabernacks and calisses.

      Nov 15, 1976. The PQ wins the election. My resolve is that much stronger to leave upon completion of my cheap Quebec education.

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    5. Second of two:

      January or Feb 1977: Bill 1, the first iteration of PQ language legislation is tabled but does not pass for being far too stringent. Reed Scowen, then a high-ranking Quebec civil servant meets with Louis Bernard, the PQ's first Chief of Staff on Jan 14th asking Bernard how he can fit into the "New Order". Bernard suggests Scowen simply resigns, blatantly telling Scowen there is no place for Anglophones in the "New Order." A White Paper is released on the "New Order" re Quebec language and culture in effect with its creator, Camille Laurin, MD, a Psychiatrist trained at Boston College, administers shock therapy putting the minority collective on the chaise longue. Almost up there with the motives of Josef Mengele, but not physical as Mengele was. A fiendish plan without the ruthless experimentation implemented by Mengele.

      August 26, 1977: Bill 101 tabled and legislated. At long last, the common herd has its new scripture to eat, sleep and breathe by. Said to promote French as opposed to squelch English and other languages, I and most minorities are skeptical and rightly so.

      June 10th 1982: With the assistance of my late mother, I go to Ottawa to set up my first apartment away from home. Convocation was the day before, on June 9th. I stop the car metres before the Ontario border having my mother take the wheel and drive over the border. I fulfill my goal set 8 agonizing years earlier of walking out of godforsaken Quebec. I have no regrets for having done so to this day. I remember my walkout like it was yesterday.

      December 15, 1988: Bill 178 legislated and passed by so-called federalist Robert "Bou-bou" Bourassa in his 2nd iteration (life, really) as Quebec premier. Bill 22 + Bill 178 = Bill 200, i.e., Bou-bou screws the minority community 100% x 2! In protest I ink over the French on my bilingual Ontario driver's license license. Once got stopped by a cop for speeding, sees the French inked off my license and decreases the fine. In early 1989, my letter the the editor in one of the major Toronto newspapers protesting Bill 178 was the lead letter that day. I think it was a Saturday, too!

      June 23, 1990: I was indebted to Elijah Harper, a First Nations MLA in the Manitoba legislature deprives the legislature of ratifying the Meech Lake Accord. Months earlier, Clyde Wells, premier of Newfoundland overturns his predecessor's ratification of Meech. Mr. Brian Mulroney was pissed off like there was no tomorrow. Mr. Sauga was deeeelighted! After Bou-bou's shenanigans of 18 months earlier, I wanted that thing to die like the kings under the guillotine! Thank you, THANK YOU THANK YOU Messrs. Harper and Wells!

      ...and the rest is ever increasing ugly history, esp. between the Habs/Cunnyworth fiasco of earlier this year and now the endless bullying and rabid racist embellishing in the rag AKA the French language media.

      Delete
    6. adski,

      That what my problem is. Nobody calls out those bozos (including OQLF) for what essentially taking the laws into their own hand. The way I see it if the laws do not prohibit something than it is not illegal to do so. Non-accommodating? Yes. Non-appeasing? Certainly. Inconvenient? For them, of course. But it is a free society, is it not?

      As it is, there is no way Bill 101 includes the prohibitions those separatist bozo wants. No way. Not without major challenge international human rights bodies, which the province will certainly lose. Should that happen, the province can not hide behind "protection of French language" anymore since such action is certainly an offense towards other language groups.

      Delete
    7. Non-accommodating? Yes. Non-appeasing? Yes. Inconvenient? Yes. Insubordinate? Yes. Rebellious? Yes. Defiant? Yes. Bold? Yes. Non-conforming? Yes.

      Illegal? No.

      The govt of Quebec essentially wants to have a cake and eat it too. It does not want to interfere with registered trademarks lawfully not to alienate the international business community, especially the Americans. But it STILL wants QC non-francophones to defer to the francophones in business. So it doesn't extend the judicial rule to sensitive areas, but at the same time turns a blind eye to extrajudicial pressure from militant groups on people by refusing to close the case by stating unequivocally that trademarks are off limits.

      It's not a new tactic either to keep regulations vague and allow different interpretations. It's a dick move, but Quebec has always been governed by dicks, so what else is new.

      Delete
    8. "Circa 1967: French teachers and other French language nationalists fear for their jobs figuring immigrants and non-French speakers will not send their children to English school. Job protection becomes a major concern. What to do?"

      MGuy, so it goes way back. I wasn't aware this goes back to the 1960's, but these days I totally see insecurity and thirst for more and more protectionism coming from Quebec teachers, especially FSL teachers. A lot of hysterical reaction to anything English comes from those circles.

      On one hand, it's understandable. On the other, they should be able to temper their self interest since their mission is the look after the welfare of children. Arguing that children do not need English, or not so much English (how much is enough is their arbitrary call of course), is not doing the children a favor. Especially in today's market.

      Delete
  7. Why not call a spade a spade. Instead of saying ethnocentric, say fascistic which would be more accurate.

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  8. "when that young Black SSJB volunteer who terrorized the neighborhood grows up and realizes that even with his French, he is a second class citizen, it will be a rude and sad awakening."

    No doubt about this. It is bound to happen one day. The guy will be ruing his youth wasted on nonsense, spent with people who are by no means his friends.

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    1. Que dire des bénévoles Québécois qui travaillent pour le parti conservateur?

      Delete
    2. Adski: I hope that "Black SSJB volunteer" has full karma coming his way for that...from those he thought were his allies, and believe me, it will come! FOOL!

      Delete
    3. Sauga,vous savez ce que vous devez faire maintenant pour que l'on vous accepte comme un vrai Québécois.

      Delete
  9. "Just this week the Montreal police were again sanctioned for racial profiling and ordered to pay an Arab businessman $18,000 for harassment. You'd think this stuff was something from the 1950's, but it's par for the course as police continue their war on minorities."

    Editor, forget the 1950s. The issue is very fresh and current.

    I personally know two Montreal cops who live in Chambly. The man works in a narcotics unit in Montreal Nord, the woman is a beat cop in Lachine. These people are the type of racists Jim Crow has nothing on. To the guy, the definition of a gang is, I quote, "no more than two black guys walking down the street". To her, seeing a darker person on a street of Chambly once made her exclaim, in front of my gf who's her childhood friend, something along the lines of "what are these negres doing in this neighborhood".

    Racism, narrow-mindedness, and parochialism that emanates from these people literally hurts my soul. That, and the fact that to have a conversation with them, I have to suspend my IQ for the time being, or lower it by at least 30 points down to their level.

    That these people police us is a mockery. And they are highly ranked at this point. The guy runs the show in his precinct.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yannick, you took the words right off my fingertips! Adski, why don't you the next time mention they should become sheriffs in Alabaya-ma or Miss'ssip-eh. Their counties would be their own fiefdoms, and they have about the right attitude and IQ for the job. What country bumpkins! A couple of Rebs!

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  10. Adski,avez-vous des chiffres concernant la criminalité dans la région de Montréal?Les policiers ont-ils raison de croire que certains groupes sont plus à risque que d'autres?Avez-vous déjà fait des rondes avec des équipes de policiers la nuit?Avant d'en arriver à des conclusions trop hâtives,je vous suggère de considérer les questions que je viens d'énumérer ci-haut.Merci.

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    Replies
    1. Et merde, de la rhétorique d'extrême droite... ils utilisent les mêmes arguments sur Fox News pour justifier le meurtre de Trayvon Martin. "Les noirs font plus de crimes, donc on est naturellement plus enclins à les traiter avec suspicion, vous voyez..."

      J'avais de plus hautes espérances pour vous les québecois.

      Delete
    2. Je vous rappelle que je n'ai fais que soulever quelques questions.J'essaie simplement de comprendre la situation avant de sauter aux conclusions.

      Delete
    3. Oui, bien sûr. Et ces questions ne sont que racistes car elles encouragent le profilage racial.

      Delete
  11. I find it ironic that Quebec Immigration provides bonus marks for immigrants who speak French with the idea that these people will more easily integrate and thus help preserve the Quebec Culture and provide voting power for PQ governments.

    Unfortunately, Quebec Separatists are fundamentally wrong in thinking that these immigrants would prefer the Quebec culture over their own and when it turns out they don't, the Separatists turn around and curse (à la Jacques Parizeau) the very immigrants they hoped would save their culture but who rather turn out to speak their own language and keep their own traditions.

    In fact, I know a lot of people who have used this preferential language treatment to get into Canada and move over to Ontario. Many Lebanese (Lebanon is a former colony of France), and this is coming from my Lebanese friend himself, all know they can use Quebec to get into Canada, get a Canadian Passport, go back to Lebanon and come back to use our Health Care system. That's why Canada sent A FLEET OF CRUISE SHIPS to Lebanon years ago when Israel started bombing Hezbollah to pick up all those 25,000 "Canadians" (or Vacationers?).

    By the way, what is Quebec culture? Cabaine a sucre? poutine? Montreal Canadiens? Bon-homme? English bashing? Speaking French?

    If it's based on language, (and that's what the entire suppression of the Anglophone is based on because you can't discriminate on any more blatant grounds since that would amount to racism) then Quebec culture is actually not Quebec culture at all.

    To exemplify this point, a couple of years ago I remember the organizers for the Saint-Jean batiste day celebrations in Quebec city kicked some English bands (from Montreal) off the program because they where English and obviously because they didn't reflect Quebec Culture or what the event was about.

    Know who got on the program? A french band from Morocco. While yes this band did sing in French they also sang in Arabic. I want to know how these separatists can feel more of a cultural connection with a band that is from half way across the world, has a completely different culture (not North American, not really European either), a different religion (not catholic) and different values, than with blokes from Montreal. Yes, the Moroccan band spoke French, but their French was more like broken Parisian French with no reflection of the distinct Quebec dialect.

    The fact they associate themselves more with cultures on a different continent under the pretense of the Francopholie rather than being associated with their own North American reality is bizarre. And they love these French colony cultures I have noticed and embrace it. I don't understand why English culture doesn't receive a similar embrace?

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    1. They put the English band back in, in that anecdote you're sharing, after they kicked out the previous organising committee. The prevailing argument was that English Quebeckers were part of Quebec and so should totally sing during the S-J-B.

      I wish I could offer you articles, but it's been a long time and they've all been allowed to lapse. I can offer you the end of the wikipedia article, though.

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    2. Encore plus bizarre John James Charest n'a jamais participé à aucune de nos fêtes Nationales en tant que...Premier ministre du Québec.

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    3. Est-ce que les premiers ministres péquistes y assistaient?

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    4. Toujours aux premières loges.

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    5. Maybe they should have someone like this at the St Jean Baptiste celebration:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFlHO3r9UBk

      After all, possibly as many as 40% of francophone Quebecers share his heritage too ;-)

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    6. Cool video! I think fully half of all Quebecers have Irish blood in their veins (like myself) but all too many have lost links with their ancestry. There are plenty of francophone Blackburns and Teasdales who barely speak any English today. If you can believe it, not many francophones attend the fun, crazy and historic spring-is-coming St. Patrick's Day parade because it's "pour les anglais" (as opposed to Celts... I know, I know...).

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    7. Est-ce que Alanis Morrissette ou Avril Lavigne parlent français?

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    8. Alanis maybe a bit, Avril not at all.

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    9. Lots of celebrities speak lots of foreign languages! Not sure why Ontarians should be singled out but I just discovered that French & Saunders did a spoof of Alanis! LOL!

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    10. Impressionnant...Aucun accent

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnuvQphnv9c

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    11. Alanis does speak some french, there was an article on her about how when she met the pope some cardinals were insulting her in French thinking she coudn't understand. She was outraged.

      Avril Lavigne has a father from France, which explains her name. Other than that it doesen't appear as if she knows the language.

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    12. The Cat,

      Kobe Bryant speaks Italian? Color me surprised. Now I like him even more and wishes that the Lakers can win it again this year, even though it is very improbable.

      However, the notion that French is enough in Quebec is patently deceptive. Name me one famous Quebecer, well-known beyond Quebec border, outside of the realm of politics, who does not speak English. By the same token, was there any Quebec Premier who did not speak English as well?

      Delete
    13. Oh that's easy.

      For most of Quebec's intellectual class, language IS culture. They're synonyms.

      Ergo, if you speak English, you ARE English (because there's only one English culture)
      and if you speak French, you ARE Quebecois.

      It's the dumbest idea ever, but it explains every bit of language legislation and argument for the past 50 years.

      -Kevin

      Delete
  12. I also don't understand why should my culture (Canadian) suffer because the French want to preserve their culture or want to be served in French at MacDonald's? They obviously need to suppress other people's free will because their own kind can't even preserve it.

    Personally, English is more appealing because it is an easier and more useful language. It is the language of international commerce and business, and there is no denying American English Culture is ubiquitous. Why? Probably because they have had a lot to contribute in substance to humanity.

    I can speak French since I grew up in Montreal and fell for this "oh its Quebec, you have to speak French" garbage. While I know how to speak french (because I'm not an idiot), I choose not to anymore. It is a difficult language full of complicated and unnecessary rules and honestly, I don't like how it rolls off my tongue. I also don't want to encourage a practice that has basically been forced down my throat.

    I left Quebec to move to Toronto, not because of the french issue directly, but indirectly because Quebec is losing its economic edge. Large and innovative companies compete on a global level now and if your workforce is confined to French then you don't have a big market, unless you make maple syrup equipment. The businesses and economy for the future of Quebec in my opinion is questionable. For example, Mississauga alone has more head offices than Montreal. And the companies in Missiauga aren't just companies like Jean-Coutu and or cheese companies like Saputo. While Quebec has Bombardier, it is a quasi-french institution subsidized by the gouvernment and there is no way that the gouvernment will let it fail.

    I see the difference between Toronto and Quebec. In Quebec you always hear them bashing Ontario as saying they have no culture, its more expensive to live there etc. You know what, gas is cheaper, wine is cheaper, you make more money, condo and housing prices are almost the same (don't compare downtown Toronto near the CN because if Montreal had a waterfront section like the great lakes it probably would be the same price. ), there is tons of cultural diversity, and yes taxes are lower cause they don't support free loading French students/socialists (Get a loan and learn how to make a buck).

    Good blog.

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  13. I also don't understand why should my culture (Canadian) suffer because the French want to preserve their culture or want to be served in French at MacDonald's? They obviously need to suppress other people's free will because their own kind can't even preserve it.

    Personally, English is more appealing because it is an easier and more useful language. It is the language of international commerce and business, and there is no denying American English Culture is ubiquitous. Why? Probably because they have had a lot to contribute in substance to humanity.

    I can speak French since I grew up in Montreal and fell for this "oh its Quebec, you have to speak French" garbage. While I know how to speak french (because I'm not an idiot), I choose not to anymore. It is a difficult language full of complicated and unnecessary rules and honestly, I don't like how it rolls off my tongue. I also don't want to encourage a practice that has basically been forced down my throat.

    I left Quebec to move to Toronto, not because of the french issue directly, but indirectly because Quebec is losing its economic edge. Large and innovative companies compete on a global level now and if your workforce is confined to French then you don't have a big market, unless you make maple syrup equipment. The businesses and economy for the future of Quebec in my opinion is questionable. For example, Mississauga alone has more head offices than Montreal. And the companies in Missiauga aren't just companies like Jean-Coutu and or cheese companies like Saputo. While Quebec has Bombardier, it is a quasi-french institution subsidized by the gouvernment and there is no way that the gouvernment will let it fail.

    I see the difference between Toronto and Quebec. In Quebec you always hear them bashing Ontario as saying they have no culture, its more expensive to live there etc. You know what, gas is cheaper, wine is cheaper, you make more money, condo and housing prices are almost the same (don't compare downtown Toronto near the CN because if Montreal had a waterfront section like the great lakes it probably would be the same price. ), there is tons of cultural diversity, and yes taxes are lower cause they don't support free loading French students/socialists (Get a loan and learn how to make a buck).

    Good blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "English is more appealing because it is an easier [...] (French) is a difficult language full of complicated and unnecessary rules."

      I have a theory, a totaly crazy idea : english is easier to you because it is your native language.

      English is full of crazy rules too, you just don't see them.

      For plural, you add a -s at the end of a noun. Unlike french, that's a simple rule. But there are exceptions for words ending with -s or -sh in the first place ; in these cases, you add -es. For instance, one genius, two geniuses. But there is an exception to this exception : one axis, two axes (not axises...). What about "fish", do we write two "fishes"? No, we write "two fish".

      English sound system has 45 phonemes (individual sounds), french has 36 phonemes. Not only are there sounds often difficult to pronounce, the spelling system doesn't help much knowing how to pronounce a word ; for instance, how do you pronounce "-ough"? Do you promounce it as in "tough", as in "though", as in "through" or as in "cough"?

      The "th" sounds in "this" and "third" do not exist in french, that's why we say "Dis" and Tird". (And the "th" in those two words are not pronounced the same way, yet the "th" is written the same way...)

      And by the way, why do we write "to pronOUnce" but not "pronOUnciation" ? Why "pronUnciation?

      I know that french is complicated, specifically regarding conjugaison. But I find it easier than english. Do you know why? Take a guess : it is my native language...

      Chinese grammar has no exception. Chinese find both french and english grammars totaly crazy. Of course their writing system is complicated. C'est du chinois pour moi.

      Delete
    2. It's true... English is notoriously difficult to learn to write (not so much to speak) for non-natives. It has so many exceptions due to being a mongrel language with many European influences, especially Germanic and Norman.

      Tough, though, thought, through, thorough... gah! It makes no sense!

      Do you know how to pronounce the word "ghoti"? It's "fish"! ("gh" as in "rough", "o" as in "women", "ti" as in "motion"--> fish!)

      OK, that was my feeble attempt at levity for today...

      Delete
    3. Michel Patrice, the problem isn't grammar or linguistic challenges. It's the repressive laws used to prop up one language over all others. French is a beautiful, lyrical language. One with, yes, many maddening exceptions to the rules, but a lovely language just the same.

      The problem is the fascism, the xenophobia, the racism.

      Delete
    4. +1!!! Although it's all done under the guise of "protecting French" so it doesn't become a cultural relic like in Louisiana, I don't believe this argument for a second. I'm not worried about the state of French here, it has done fine for centuries. It's the attempt to eradicate English as if everything that has happened since the Fall of New France 252 years ago was just a spot of bother and let's never mind any of that and return to the halcyon days of yore...

      Delete
    5. @The Cat

      Vous savez il y a peut-être des gens (dont moi-même) qui veulent vraiment préserver la langue française en Amérique. Et ce n'est pas nécessairement basé sur l'éradication de la langue anglaise.

      Oui il y en a qui font ça. Oui je suis d'accord avec vous que c'est immonde. Mais de là à dire qu'il n'y a personne de sincère... quelle chance a le dialogue quand on présume que les gens du bord opposé mentent?

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    7. M.Patrice: "I have a theory, a totaly crazy idea : english is easier to you because it is your native language."

      My native language is neither English nor French, and I concur with this statement: "English is more appealing because it is an easier and more useful language"

      There goes your theory.

      Delete
    8. Sans tenir compte de l'utilité,est-ce que le polonais est plus facile que l'anglais?

      Delete
    9. adski,

      In some ways, english is easier. English spelling isn't easy, but it doesn't matter much when you speak. In french, the difficult conjugaison system matters even when you speak. My reaction was more about the following statement "(French) is a difficult language full of complicated and unnecessary rules". English, which might be easier than french, is also a difficult language full of complicated and unnecessary rules.

      My theory : english is easier than french for a native english speaker.

      You, whose native language is neither french nor english, find english easier. So, if this proves my theory wrong, does it mean that : english is NOT easier than french for a native english speaker? Of course, it doesn't.

      Delete
    10. Anonymous6:27,

      "the problem isn't grammar or linguistic challenges. It's the repressive laws used to prop up one language over all others."

      Yes, yes, I got that part about our fascism, our xenophobia and our racism.

      There is nevertheless a linguistic challenge. That's why I don't blame (the not so numerous) anglos who never learned french depite having lived here forever for not having learned french, french is not easy.

      Delete
    11. M. Patrice, I have a lot of friends for whom English is a second or even third language and they have all told me that English is simply an easier language to learn and speak.

      There's also the matter of English being more accessible. If someone speaks rudimentary English, they are typically understood by native English speakers. People are used to hearing English being spoken by non-native speakers so differences in accents and pronunciation are sort of a given. With French, it is the exact opposite. Rarely is there a time when I have a significant conversation in French with someone I don't know in Quebec, that they don't point out my accent either by applauding my command of French, or by criticizing it (yes - the reactions are truly that varied).

      Face it: French is just not as open or inviting as English.

      Delete
    12. So your theory, monsieur Patrice, is that English is easier than French for ...drum roll please... native English speakers.

      So either:

      1. You made a discovery of the century....or
      2. That's not what you meant to say, because it's a no brainer. By saying to the other commenter: English is easier for you because it's your native tongue, you implied that it may not be the case for non-native speakers. As as a non-native speaker, I can assure you that English is easy, and much easier than French. It is also ubiquitous so you can pick it up even in a country that's not English speaking.

      That many Quebeckers don't pick it up because politics and historical resentment stand in their way is a different story.

      Delete
    13. I have to say that English was easier to learn than French for me, and French is my first language! No gender, no need to conjugate verbs, all tenses are written essentially the same way, etc...

      But then again, in my high school program we spent very little time learning grammar and syntax and much more time doing reading comprehension, etc... so that may be part of it.

      Delete
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    15. "Tout à fait,la langue française exige de la logique ainsi que de la rigueur intellectuelle,ce qui n'est pas le cas de l'anglais."

      ... and your point is...?

      Delete
    16. He arrived at a conclusion that the Quebecois are smart. He can finally feel good about himself.

      English being easier than French though, is it still easy? Maybe, maybe not.

      I think that knowing many languages is good for the mind. I'm physically able to speak 3 but it's like I know 2, because I put an X on one of the 3, on the one has been imposed and totally politicized.

      I'm now looking for a course in Spanish because I want to add to my native language and English. 2 feels like not enough.

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    17. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    18. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    19. mdblog,

      Reactions to your accent might be varied, but I would be surprized if you would get much criticism. One reaction that you probably get a lot is being asked where you come from. And maybe you resent it for being treated as a forever foreigner. (And if so, you misunderstand the intention.)

      Delete
    20. adski,

      A native english speaker says that french is difficult (and it is), I tell him that english is difficult too. I tell him, tongue in cheek, that I have a theory : english is easier for native speakers.

      No, it is not the discovery of the century.
      Yes, it is a no brainer.
      No, it doesn't mean that I am implying anything.
      It was nothing more than une de ces vérités de la Palice qu'on dit pour se moquer.
      Don't take it so seriously.

      But while we are at it, I do think that english is not easy and I do think that learning another language is a challenge, a rewarding challenge, an interesting challenge, a enjoyable challenge, nevertheless a challenge.

      Delete
  14. Hors propos mais très drôle...Hahahahaha!

    USA : des musulmans offrent une récompense pour des criminels en niqab

    http://www.postedeveille.ca/2012/04/usa-des-musulmans-offrent-une-recompense-pour-des-criminels-en-niqab.html

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  15. I'm half-French. I emigrated to Quebec a decade ago. My maternal French is among seven languages that I speak/read/write fluently.

    I am horrified by the fascist laws that are allowed (why?!) to run this xenophobic society.

    I purposely avoid speaking French. First, because it's my small way of protesting the systematic destruction of any culture, people or language other than "pure laine" Quebec (an expression that is racist in and of itself). Second, because when I speak French my French-from-France accent often gets me all kinds of attitude. Not so the local accents of my children and French-Canadian spouse.

    Make no mistake: it's not about language.

    Oh and by the way? I refuse to invest in the province, save for my main residence. Everything else (rental properties, etc.), I have outside Quebec.

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  16. "Oh and by the way? I refuse to invest in the province, save for my main residence. Everything else (rental properties, etc.), I have outside Quebec."

    Je me demande bien ce que vous venez faire ici.Maso?

    ReplyDelete
  17. "He is here for his family!"

    Originale comme réponse...Semble-t-il que beaucoup de familles d'immigrés ont le dos large.

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  18. An excellent blog post, Ed.

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    1. Hear hear! Love the "hairloop" tomatoes... I'm going to have to go check out Somerled more than Monkland this year!

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    2. Maybe there's something I'm missing. What's a hairloop tomatoe?

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    3. Doesn't exist... but it's in the picture with the article... should be "heirloom" (les tomates d'héritage).

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    4. Yeah, I can see how that would be funny to someone who knew what heirloom tomatoes were. Unfortunately my attention stops at "tomato" when I buy groceries. AFAIK they come in the regular and grape-size varieties. I'm such a philistine, lol.

      Delete
  19. While I think attacking people over which language they use is stupid and vulgar, I also think that all the triumphalist "I speak english and therefore have access to a "global world" (actually the word 'empire' is meant here) and shouldn't have to lower myself to speaking any other language"....this attitude is stupid as well. I speak both English and French, as my family are from French Canada, and many of my family still live there. In both French and in English, I have access to much in this world. French is just as vibrant as English. All those who spout about English being the new lingua franca of Europe have never been to Europe outside of the UK. On the continent of Europe, German and French are pretty much IT. English is just something to use to prepare for immigration or some worn out dream of becoming a rock star. Sure many Europeans can speak it, to varying degrees. As they can German, or French. Besides all this though, perceptions matter.

    When you rightly lament how Quebec has screwed over its Anglophone people by using cliches such as "why speak french? english is the world language" you just play into the hands of people who use your statements to prove you are racist against them. And, pardon my french, but big fucking deal. English is such a vibrant something or other. Yeah so is French. and you KNOW WHAT? 2 generations from now, our descendants will be saying "ni hao ma?" as greetings because it will be Chinese that is dominant. Get used to it, anglo-supremacists and franco-supremacists. It IS reality. (and like the present global dominance of the USA, it is coming SOON to a theater near you). Canadians, grow the fuck up. Your insecure rantings between anglo and franco are patently retarded. Insulting each other when you are both, Anglo and Franco, daughters and sons of the land, it makes me realize why Americans think little of Canada.

    Anglophones decry all of the Quebec laws which strangle them, as they rightly should. But I see a lot of replies on this blog by Anglo-supremacists which display ignorance of the Canadian anglo suppression of Gaelic and other languages in their own anglo-sphere of Canada.

    Hello POT!!?? Calling KETTLE??!!!

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    1. Who is this? Michel Patrice again? Pretending to be someone else?

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    2. Oui, il n'existe que 2-3 francos qui savent parler anglais sur tout le web. /sarcasme

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    3. Anonymous, you are exaggerating slightly.

      There are no demonstrations for the preservation of English in Québec. Anglo-Québecers feel discriminated against, and rightly so. The language laws in Québec discriminate against them while hiding behind the 'just case' of protecting the French language and culture in Québec.

      Those who protest the hardlinder's suppression of English are not saying that English is the superior tongue or culture, but merely that since Anglos form the majority of the minority in Québec (as well as being the first official language of Canada, which like or not Québec remains part of) it should be treated with some respect, especially when it's used within Anglophone communities.

      "While I think attacking people over which language they use is stupid and vulgar, I also think that all the triumphalist "I speak english and therefore have access to a "global world" (actually the word 'empire' is meant here) and shouldn't have to lower myself to speaking any other language"....this attitude is stupid as well."

      True, but from your post I assume that you are not a Quebecer, and the RoC does have a bit of difficulty understanding the cultural point of view (ie why it's so important to francophones) if they've never lived in Quebec. The whole 'debasing myself by speaking anything but English' bit refers to an extreme minority. You may wish to stop paying so much attention to the blogs of frustrated anglophone teenagers.

      As for 'global view', that view belongs to neither anglophones or francophones, if they are not bi-or-multilingual, they do not have the advantage of perspective from two different cultures. Only people with such a perspective can have 'global views' as you describe. Certes, the anglos technically have a large and more developed culture, but being a bilingual Montrealer of any mother tongue generally ensures a better cultural education.

      ''But I see a lot of replies on this blog by Anglo-supremacists which display ignorance of the Canadian anglo suppression of Gaelic and other languages in their own anglo-sphere of Canada.

      Hello POT!!?? Calling KETTLE??!!!''


      You have a point, sir. There are certainly those who say ''English is the better tongue!'' but there are extremists on both sides. Being extreme doesn't make them any less wrong. They are just as ignorant as the nationalist hardliners are.


      All those who spout about English being the new lingua franca of Europe have never been to Europe outside of the UK."

      You may wish to brush up on your statistics (or perhaps the definition of "lingua franca", as it is the most commonly used lingua franca in the world.

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  20. @AnonymousApr 28, 2012 12:31 AM

    Excellent commentaire,merci!

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